“Hell Yes, I’ll Vote for Him”: Jimmy Carter’s First Voter

Today’s post is written by Daria Labinsky, an archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library  In this coronavirus-affected election year, let’s look back at a time when presidential candidates made the rounds in person, shook everyone’s hands, gave stump speeches, and kissed babies.  Jimmy Carter with a young fan on the campaign trail, Carter Family … Continue reading “Hell Yes, I’ll Vote for Him”: Jimmy Carter’s First Voter

A Front Line of Defense: The 758th Radar Squadron and the Makah Air Force Station, Neah Bay, Washington, 1950-1988

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. "Last Pass at Makah" by Michael J. Machat. US Air Force Collection (National Archives ID 6436075). The United States Government has had a long association with Neah Bay, Washington and its inhabitants, mostly members of the Makah … Continue reading A Front Line of Defense: The 758th Radar Squadron and the Makah Air Force Station, Neah Bay, Washington, 1950-1988

Brevet Brigadier General Samuel Chapman Armstrong’s Civil War

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Gen. Samuel C. Armstrong (NAID 167250430). At Benedict, Maryland, in command of U.S. Colored Troops, on December 17, 1863, Union Army Lt. Col. Samuel Chapman Armstrong wrote, “we are fighting for humanity and freedom, the South for … Continue reading Brevet Brigadier General Samuel Chapman Armstrong’s Civil War

Virtually visiting America’s Cultural Institutions in the time of COVID

Today’s post is by John LeGloahec, Archives Specialist in the Electronics Records Division at the National Archives in College Park, MD. This post is part of an ongoing series featuring records from the National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017 (National Archives ID 20812721), a series within Record … Continue reading Virtually visiting America’s Cultural Institutions in the time of COVID

American Archives Month: Discovering Archives and Repositories in the Records of the National Register of Historic Places

Today’s post is by John LeGloahec, Archives Specialist in the Electronics Records Division at the National Archives in College Park, MD. This post is part of an ongoing series featuring records from the National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017 (National Archives ID 20812721), a series within Record … Continue reading American Archives Month: Discovering Archives and Repositories in the Records of the National Register of Historic Places

Mrs. Hartshorne’s Estate Sale and the Joking Neighbor of Patrick McGroury of Manalapan, New Jersey

Today’s post is by Claire Kluskens, Genealogy/Census Subject Matter Expert and Digital Projects Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. On August 28, 1884, a lawyer named A. A. Chambers helped Patrick McGroury of Manalapan, New Jersey, write a letter of inquiry to the Bureau of Pensions about James Hogan, who lived nearby. McGroury … Continue reading Mrs. Hartshorne’s Estate Sale and the Joking Neighbor of Patrick McGroury of Manalapan, New Jersey

Tadeusz Kościuszko: For Our Freedom and Yours

Today’s post is by Anita Solak, Archives Technician at the National Archives in Washington, DC. For several weeks in June this year the streets of Washington, DC filled with protests, marches, and demonstrations as Americans of all backgrounds came out to voice their opposition to systemic racism in the aftermath of the killing of George … Continue reading Tadeusz Kościuszko: For Our Freedom and Yours

A Life Well Lived: Amelia Tyler of the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute and the United States Patent Office, 1832-1908

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In June 1908, the Scientific American reported on the death of Amelia Tyler. The periodical noted that she had died on May 23, at her home in Washington, D.C. and that her death “has caused widespread regret … Continue reading A Life Well Lived: Amelia Tyler of the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute and the United States Patent Office, 1832-1908

Back to School: From One-Room Schools to Great Halls with the National Register of Historic Places

Today’s post is by John LeGloahec, Archives Specialist in the Electronics Records Division at the National Archives in College Park, MD. This post is part of an ongoing series featuring records from the National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017 (NAID 20812721), a series within Record Group 79: … Continue reading Back to School: From One-Room Schools to Great Halls with the National Register of Historic Places

Assignment: Neah Bay, Washington, 1909; The United States Revenue-Cutter Service and the USRC Snohomish

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Background The discovery of the mineral wealth of Alaska led immediately to a large development of the coastwise trade along the northwestern seaboard of the United States, and particularly in Puget Sound. Navigators were then, as now, … Continue reading Assignment: Neah Bay, Washington, 1909; The United States Revenue-Cutter Service and the USRC Snohomish