Image of plane and caption.

“Penguins Don’t Fly”: The Senate Military Affairs Committee, Secretary of War Baker, and Aircraft Production, 1918

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. On April 6, 1917, America entered World War I. On June 8, 1917, public announcement was made that a great fleet of 20,000 airplanes was about to be created and would be decisive of the war, months … Continue reading “Penguins Don’t Fly”: The Senate Military Affairs Committee, Secretary of War Baker, and Aircraft Production, 1918

Image of tower and other buildings with clouds in the background

Building a Radio Tower atop Mount Washington

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. “Believing that the development of experimental facilities on Mount Washington, New Hampshire, is an undertaking that is difficult of verbal description there are attached, hereto, a brief photographic record.  The pictures submitted only … Continue reading Building a Radio Tower atop Mount Washington

Image of Frank Capra standing at podium.

Frank Capra’s Security Clearance

Today's post is written by Jacob Lusk, Archives Specialist in Textual Reference at the National Archives in College Park, MD.  Though best known for such classic films as Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) and It's a Wonderful Life (1946), director Frank Capra also led a distinguished career with the United States Army. He served as a second lieutenant … Continue reading Frank Capra’s Security Clearance

U.S. and Canada Prepare for War Against … Each Other?

Today’s post is written by Larry Shockley, Archives Specialist in the Office of Innovation. A 1995 comedic film titled Canadian Bacon was directed by Michael Moore, and starred Alan Alda as a U.S. President whose approval ratings were tanking. In order to give his administration the desired boost with his base the president and his advisors … Continue reading U.S. and Canada Prepare for War Against … Each Other?

Photograph of John Werito.

John Werito Goes to War; A Story of a WWII Diné [Navajo] Code Talker

Today's post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records. Invaluable assistance to this blog was also provided by Cara Lebonick of the National Archives at St. Louis. The concept of using tribal languages as a battlefield code was first explored in … Continue reading John Werito Goes to War; A Story of a WWII Diné [Navajo] Code Talker

Prologue to Pearl Harbor: The Spy Flight that Wasn’t, Part II

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. On November 27, 1941, Lt. Cmdr. Edwin T. Layton, Fleet Intelligence Officer, United States Pacific Fleet, met with Colonel Edward W. Raley and the Intelligence Section of the Hawaiian Air Force, to discuss the B-24 reconnaissance mission. … Continue reading Prologue to Pearl Harbor: The Spy Flight that Wasn’t, Part II

Image of B-24 plane on the ground.

Prologue to Pearl Harbor: The Spy Flight that Wasn’t, Part I

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. On December 4, 1941, at 9:08 pm, at Hamilton Field, located along the western shore of San Pablo Bay in the southern portion of Novato, California, 1st Lt. Ted Faulkner with his crew in their Consolidated B-24A … Continue reading Prologue to Pearl Harbor: The Spy Flight that Wasn’t, Part I

Image of US Military personnel stack coffins containing the remains of the victims of the Jonestown Tragedy for transport to Dover Air Force Base, Delaware (NAID 6413436)

Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

Today’s post is written by Victoria Otero, an Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. November 18, 2018 marked 40 years since the passing of 918 people in the jungles of Guyana. While debate still exists as to whether or not the event was one of mass suicide or mass murder, the event … Continue reading Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

The Bureau of Reclamation’s Push to Create the Shoshone Cavern National Monument

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. “The cave was discovered by a man and his dog.” So University of Wyoming Professor Emeritus of History Phil Roberts succinctly explained it in a 2015 Wyoming State Historical Society blog post about Shoshone Cavern, Wyoming’s second named national monument and … Continue reading The Bureau of Reclamation’s Push to Create the Shoshone Cavern National Monument

Images of Camp 17.

The General Courts Martial of Lieutenant Commander Edward N. Little

Today’s post is written by William Green, Archives Technician in Textual Processing at the National Archives in Washington, DC U.S.  Navy Lieutenant Commander Edward N. Little was a prisoner of war (POW) from April 1942 until August 1945, as one of the nearly 30,000 Americans interned by the Japanese during World War II. Having survived … Continue reading The General Courts Martial of Lieutenant Commander Edward N. Little