It Will Do Everything Except Climb a Tree

Today's post was written by Joseph Gillette, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. With an eye toward the post-war needs of farmers, the Department of Agriculture conducted a series of tests from 1942 to 1943 to see if military jeeps could be repurposed for farm use after World War II. While admitting further … Continue reading It Will Do Everything Except Climb a Tree

Daylight Saving Time Begins, 1916, Part II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. An earlier posting noted that after many years of consideration around the World, Imperial Germany and Austria-Hungary became the first countries to institute Daylight Saving Time.  Great Britain and France soon followed suit. The … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time Begins, 1916, Part II

Daylight Saving Time Begins, 1916

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. After many years of consideration around the World, Imperial Germany became the first country to institute Daylight Saving Time. On April 6, 1916, the Federal Council (Bundesrat) passed an order directing a change in … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time Begins, 1916

Women in Uniform: Red Cross Service of Mona Ryan Inman in World War I

Today’s post is written by Laney Stevenson, Archives Technician at the National Archives at College Park. In highlighting the stories of bold and courageous women for Women’s History Month, the life of Mona Ryan Inman is especially noteworthy, given the incredible coincidences in the dates and locations of major World War I events and her … Continue reading Women in Uniform: Red Cross Service of Mona Ryan Inman in World War I

Atomic activity in Iran. How things change.

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In March 1948, the Department of State sent a request for information about host country atomic energy developments to its diplomatic offices overseas.  The Department directed posts to forward copies of basic laws, statutes, … Continue reading Atomic activity in Iran. How things change.

The Department of State Reacts to Public Revelations of Intelligence Activities, 1964

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The book The Invisible Government, published by Random House Publishers in 1964, is one of the first major exposés of the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).  The book was written by the … Continue reading The Department of State Reacts to Public Revelations of Intelligence Activities, 1964

Vietnam Negotiations, 1968: The Problem of Leaks

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The fall of 1968 leading up to the Presidential election on November 5, saw active peace negotiations between the United States and North Vietnam.[1] One (among many) aspect of the situation that threatened to … Continue reading Vietnam Negotiations, 1968: The Problem of Leaks

“Throw Dummy Off Dam;” Filming at the Hoover Dam

Today's post is written by Cody White, archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Cut to a close-up of the turbines turning. Cut to water pouring over the dam. Cut to the kid spitting out and over the dam. Cut to the kid looking down at the water rushing past.  Voice over; “Coming March 15th, a … Continue reading “Throw Dummy Off Dam;” Filming at the Hoover Dam

Celebrating Victory in Europe (VE) Day, 1945

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. As World War II in Europe drew to a victorious close in late April 1945, the Department of State sent the following circular telegram to American diplomatic and consular officers.[1]  In it, the Department … Continue reading Celebrating Victory in Europe (VE) Day, 1945

Aftermath of War: A World War I Hero Lost at Sea: The Death of Charles Whittlesey, 1921

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. One of the more notable incidents in the combat experience of U.S. troops during World War I is that of the so-called "Lost Battalion." During the fighting in the Meuse-Argonne in October 1918, over … Continue reading Aftermath of War: A World War I Hero Lost at Sea: The Death of Charles Whittlesey, 1921