The Resurrection of World War II Lend-Lease Records on the USSR: A Story in Seven Parts

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Among the records of the Foreign Economic Administration (RG 169) in the National Archives are microfilms of the files of the USSR Branch of that agency.  The records constitute the primary policy and subject files … Continue reading The Resurrection of World War II Lend-Lease Records on the USSR: A Story in Seven Parts

An American Car on the Road in the USSR, 1972

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The tight restrictions on travelers in the USSR closed more than 97% of that country to most foreigners.  The travel restrictions particularly affected diplomats from the Western Powers.  Nevertheless, from time to time, staff of … Continue reading An American Car on the Road in the USSR, 1972

The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Paris

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, often referred to as the “Spanish flu,” was the greatest pandemic of the 20th Century.  It killed upwards of 50 million people worldwide, striking without regard to country or social … Continue reading The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Paris

Over 650 Newly Digitized Navy Logbooks in the National Archives Catalog

Today's post was written by Gina Perry, Archives Specialist at the National Archives in Washington, DC It was 70 degrees early in the morning on April 24, 1862, according to that day’s entry in the logbook of the U.S.S. Hartford, as the ship sailed its way up the mouth of the Mississippi River: “From 4 … Continue reading Over 650 Newly Digitized Navy Logbooks in the National Archives Catalog

Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division, Part II

Today's post was written by Jan Hodges, volunteer at the National Archives at College Park, MD. This is a continuation from Part I. Bleary eyed American soldiers were jolted to full wakefulness by the tremendous noise of the barrage in a fog created by nature and intensified by haze from exploding shells.  Both explosive and … Continue reading Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division, Part II

Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division

Today's post is by Jan Hodges, volunteer at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In April 1918, after World War I had ground along for nearly four years, the 26th Division of the American army was assigned to the front lines under French command.  A large German raid on April 20th penetrated the American … Continue reading Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division

Tony Curtis on Creating Good Will for America: 1956

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In 1956, Tony Curtis was an up-and-coming actor.  In a career stretching from the 1940s to the 2000s, he starred in both dramatic and comedic films.  By 1956, he had had some success in such … Continue reading Tony Curtis on Creating Good Will for America: 1956

The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Philadelphia

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, often referred to as the “Spanish flu,” was the greatest pandemic of the 20th Century.  It killed upwards of 50 million people worldwide, striking without regard to country or … Continue reading The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Philadelphia

Recognizing Women in Foreign Affairs, 1957

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In 1957, the U.S. Foreign Service had relatively few women members and up to that date only seven women had ever held the position of Minister or Ambassador (head of a diplomatic post).  The … Continue reading Recognizing Women in Foreign Affairs, 1957

Reading the Riot Act: American Reaction to Leaks in the Foreign Press

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The leak of sensitive information to the American press is a perpetual problem for U.S. Government officials.  See here, here, and here for earlier posts on that subject.  The U.S. government, however, is not … Continue reading Reading the Riot Act: American Reaction to Leaks in the Foreign Press