An image of Harvey Milk and Jimmy Carter shaking hands.

Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

Today’s post is written by Daria Labinsky, an Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum June 25 marks the fortieth anniversary of gay rights activist and San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk’s Gay Freedom Day speech, sometimes called the “Hope” speech, in which he called on President Jimmy Carter to speak out against Proposition 6, … Continue reading Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

“We Suggest a Bacardi Cocktail Before Lunch,” WWII Era Menus from the Mountain West

By Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver This post is dedicated to the memory of historian Robert “Bob” Autobee, 1961-2018, whose many writing credits include a co-write of the book “Lost Restaurants of Denver,” and from whose various discussions of restaurant and food history with me while working in our research room … Continue reading “We Suggest a Bacardi Cocktail Before Lunch,” WWII Era Menus from the Mountain West

T.V. Pearson and the Parachute Scheme

Today’s post is written by Richard Elsom, an Archives Technician at the National Archives at Denver. In the West, wildland fire is a regular threat to populated spaces as well as the rugged backcountry found in forests and wilderness areas. In 1939, in an effort to improve response time on fires in remote areas, the … Continue reading T.V. Pearson and the Parachute Scheme

Redheaded Bertha and William Greene: Persecuted Love in the Arizona Territory

Today's post is written by Kimberly Gorman, an Archives Technician at the National Archives at Riverside, CA Currently, I am working on processing records from Record Group 21, Records of the District Courts of the United States, which is the largest collection of records we have here at the National Archives at Riverside.  RG 21 … Continue reading Redheaded Bertha and William Greene: Persecuted Love in the Arizona Territory

Concrete and Canyons: Senator Robert Kennedy’s 1967 Family Vacation

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Nearly 50 years ago on June 29, 1967 an airplane landed at Hall’s Crossing near the upper end of Utah’s Lake Powell. On hand to meet the plane was San Juan County Commissioner Calvin Black who presented two Navajo blankets to … Continue reading Concrete and Canyons: Senator Robert Kennedy’s 1967 Family Vacation

Considerable Talent and Great Promise: the Early Years of Navajo Artist Beatien Yazz

Today’s post is written by Cody White, National Archives at Denver, with special thanks to Gwen Granados; National Archives at Riverside, John Seamans; National Archives at San Francisco, and Theresa Fitzgerald; National Archives at St. Louis “…I had the pleasure of seeing some of the paintings of Beatin [sic] Yazz. He is a young Navajo … Continue reading Considerable Talent and Great Promise: the Early Years of Navajo Artist Beatien Yazz

Can a Souvenir Lead to the Slammer? The Denver Mint Weighs in on Elongated Coins

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and collector of elongated coins, having picked up over 600 in his travels across the United States. Crushed penny. Pressed penny. Smushed penny. Squished penny. Regardless of the name, when you start to look, one sees them everywhere: at zoos and … Continue reading Can a Souvenir Lead to the Slammer? The Denver Mint Weighs in on Elongated Coins

The CCC . . . in Color!

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. In his first 100 days in office, President Franklin Roosevelt worked furiously to tamp down the widespread unemployment and economic unrest that gripped the United States back in 1932. Arguably the most famous legislation passed that spring was the Emergency Conservation … Continue reading The CCC . . . in Color!

“Cutting Capers on the Sands of North Africa”: A Soldier’s Art before, during, and after World War II

Today’s post was written by Jennifer Eltringham, a summer 2016 intern at the National Archives at Denver. Albert Racine of the Blackfoot Tribe from Browning, Montana, enlisted in the U.S. Army in April of 1942, one day before his 35th birthday. When he left home to serve in World War II, however, he was not alone. … Continue reading “Cutting Capers on the Sands of North Africa”: A Soldier’s Art before, during, and after World War II

Detour Ahead: The Paving of the White House Driveway

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives in Denver. The scourge of road trip vacations. The bane of work commutes. Chances are every person who drives has a recent complaint or two about road construction hindering their plans and it’s possible that 79 years ago President Franklin Roosevelt too had … Continue reading Detour Ahead: The Paving of the White House Driveway