An image of Harvey Milk and Jimmy Carter shaking hands.

Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

Today’s post is written by Daria Labinsky, an Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum June 25 marks the fortieth anniversary of gay rights activist and San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk’s Gay Freedom Day speech, sometimes called the “Hope” speech, in which he called on President Jimmy Carter to speak out against Proposition 6, … Continue reading Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

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“Fake News” 1942: President Roosevelt and the Chicago Tribune

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park During the first months of 1942, two individuals in the Office of Facts and Figures, within the Office for Emergency Management of the Executive Office of the President, drew up lists of newspapers critical of the Roosevelt Administration.[1] … Continue reading “Fake News” 1942: President Roosevelt and the Chicago Tribune

Berlin Reacts to the Assassination of John F. Kennedy

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. After President John F. Kennedy's triumphant June 1963 visit to West Berlin to show support for that city and his famous proclamation "Ich bin ein Berliner," it should not be surprising that citizens of … Continue reading Berlin Reacts to the Assassination of John F. Kennedy

The Department of State and the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Keeping the Field Informed

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Even though American Foreign Service Officers overseas received the news about the tragic events in Dallas through public media, the Department of State had the responsibility to provide its posts with official updates.  Consequently, … Continue reading The Department of State and the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Keeping the Field Informed

The Federal Bureau of Investigation Records Relating to the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: The Challenge of Abbreviations and Euphemisms

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. With the recent releases of records relating to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy it might be useful for readers of Federal Bureau Investigation (FBI) records that form part of the released records, to better understand actually … Continue reading The Federal Bureau of Investigation Records Relating to the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: The Challenge of Abbreviations and Euphemisms

When did the President’s Home become the “White House”?

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. During the nineteenth century, the residence of the President of the United States was routinely referred to as the "Executive Mansion."  President Theodore Roosevelt changed that in 1901.  On October 17 of that year, … Continue reading When did the President’s Home become the “White House”?

Receiving Notification of President Kennedy’s Shooting: November 1963

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On November 22, 1963, Secretary of State Dean Rusk was aboard a U.S. Air Force plane over the Pacific Ocean.  He was leading a delegation of Cabinet officials to Japan to meet with their … Continue reading Receiving Notification of President Kennedy’s Shooting: November 1963

Thomas Jefferson and the Case of the Missing Letters

Today’s post is written by Jackie Kilby, Archives Technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. After a meeting with President George Washington in Mount Vernon on October 1, 1792, Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson rode off to Alexandria. It was only later that day did he realize he “unfortunately dropped… some papers… [on] … Continue reading Thomas Jefferson and the Case of the Missing Letters

The President Says Thank You, 1948: The Marshall Plan

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On June 5, 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall addressed the graduating class at Harvard University. In his speech, Marshall noted that World War II had caused "the dislocation of the entire fabric … Continue reading The President Says Thank You, 1948: The Marshall Plan

Detour Ahead: The Paving of the White House Driveway

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives in Denver. The scourge of road trip vacations. The bane of work commutes. Chances are every person who drives has a recent complaint or two about road construction hindering their plans and it’s possible that 79 years ago President Franklin Roosevelt too had … Continue reading Detour Ahead: The Paving of the White House Driveway