The Search for Hitler’s Political Testament, Personal Will, and Marriage Certificate, Part I

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. This is the first post of a multi-part series.

HF1-112492431_2009_002

Cover page to Adolf Hitler’s Political Testament, Personal Will, and Marriage Certificate (National Archives identifier 6883511)

The three couriers Heinz Lorenz, Wilhelm Zander, and Willi Johannmeier, carrying copies of Adolf Hitler’s political testament, personal will, and marriage certificate, who had left Hitler’s bunker in Berlin eventually made their way to Potsdam and Brandenburg. On May 11 they crossed the Elbe at Parey, between Magdeburg and Genthin, and passed ultimately, as foreign workers, into the area of the Western Allies, transported by American trucks. By this time the war was over, and Zander and Lorenz lost heart and easily convinced themselves that their mission had now no purpose or possibility of fulfillment. Johannmeier allowed himself to be influenced by them, although he still believed he would have been able to complete his mission.[1]

The three men split up at this point. Zander and Lorenz went to the house of Zander’s relatives in Hannover. There the two men parted and Zander proceeded south until he reached Munich on May 28 where he stayed with his wife Felicitas at 4 Kepler Strasse. After two days Zander went to Tegernsee (some 30 miles southeast of Munich), an area, that as late as December was considered a “hot spot” due to many high ranking Nazis hiding there. At Tegernsee, Zander hid his documents in a trunk. He changed his name, his identity, his status, his few friends let it be known that he was dead; and began an altogether new life under the name of Friedrich Wilhelm Paustin. He was able to obtain a blank paybook from an abandoned Wehrmacht stock in the Tegernsee area and on the basis of this other identification papers were issued to him. Under the name of Friedrich Wilhelm Paustin, he entered the German Military Hospital “Seeheim” from June 6 until June 24, when he was released to the Bad Aibling Prisoner of War Enclosure for discharge. He then traveled, apparently, to Tegernsee. Johannmeier meanwhile went to his family’s home in Iserlohn in Westphalia, and buried his documents in a bottle in the back garden. Lorenz decided to live under a cover name and to await events. Lorenz eventually ended up in Luxembourg and found work as a journalist under the assumed name of George Thiers.[2]    

With the war over and things returning somewhat to normal, Heinz Lorenz thought the time was ripe to disclose that he had information of great interest. During the first week of November, using an alias, and posing as a journalist from Luxembourg, he approached the British authorities in Hannover for work and offered to give details of life inside Hitler’s bunker. Questions were asked as to how he had acquired this knowledge. As his answers were not clearly expressed, suspicions were aroused and he was subsequently arrested for possessing false identity papers. It was decided to send him to Fallingbostel, where the British had established a camp, using the former Stalag 11B for allied prisoners, to hold suspected war criminals and others under the “Arrest” category. There they were immediately searched by army personnel for any items or materials of intelligence value. Many of the Germans were found to have “smoking gun” material. This material was handled at Fallingbostel by the 3rd British Counter-Intelligence Section, under the command of Captain Rollo Reid. This Section included five Jewish German-born bilingual British soldiers. They did translation and interrogation work. When Lorenz arrived at the camp, during a routine search a corporal noticed the unusual bulkiness of the man’s shoulder pads. He asked him to remove his jacket and then proceeded to rip open the shoulders and found a number of documents. He instantly recognized that these must be documents of importance, even though they were typed in German and he could not understand them. Seeking advice, he put them in a safe place and telephoned Reid. This was in the middle of the night. The corporal gave him a brief description of the find and Reid realized that the documents needed immediate investigation. When arriving at the office Reid discovered that the signature shown to him on some of the documents appeared to be that of Hitler. He now needed urgent confirmation and at 5am called in five of his men who spoke German and locked the door.[3]

In the early hours of the morning Reid proceeded to distribute the documents among the five men. He asked them whether they could identify what they held in their hands. Unanimously they burst out saying “This is Hitler’s Will. Not a copy but the original.” The pages changed hands. They carefully read and scrutinized the papers and confirmed earlier findings. Reid then had the five men translate Hitler’s wills and Goebbels’ addendum. They retired to their offices, one man per office and were ordered to lock the door. They were not to be disturbed until they had finished their translations.[4]

After finishing the translations, they exchanged documents and notes, carefully scrutinizing each other’s translations. Reid pressed them to finish the job quickly, as he had somewhat prematurely contacted Lt. Gen. Brian Horrocks, commander of XXX Corps, informing him of the find of “some very important documents.” Equipped with the originals of both the political testament and personal will, and Goebbels’s appendix, as well as the translations, Reid and four others set off for headquarters. They arrived well before noon. They were immediately ushered into Horrock’s office. Before perusing the documents Horrocks dismissed his staff and spoke privately with Reid and his men. He was then shown the original documents and their translation. Very briefly he questioned them and explained that his next step would be to telephone London to ascertain the genuineness of the papers. He then brought out champagne and made a short speech, complimenting them on the swift and efficient way that they had dealt with this exceptional find. Back at Fallingbostel the men received instructions not to divulge their find to anyone, but to exercise complete silence.[5]

During an interrogation of Lorenz by the 3rd British Counter-Intelligence Section he admitted that his real name was Heinz Lorenz, and that he had been Goebbels’ Press Attaché, whose primary responsibility had been to monitor enemy radio broadcasts. It was he who had brought Hitler news of Himmler’s attempt to negotiate with the Allies. He was then interrogated in great detail. He spoke freely, and the section’s assessment of him at the time was that he was a Mitlaeufer (someone who ran with the pack). After a long process of interrogation Lorenz at last told a story which was believed to be true. He said that he, together with Wilhelm Zander (assistant to Bormann) and Willi Johannmeier (assistant to General Burgdorf), left Hitler’s bunker on April 29, having each received a set of documents which they were ordered to deliver to Field Marshal Schoerner, Admiral Doenitz, and to Munich for preservation and eventual publication. Lorenz had been interrogated in detail on how he came into possession of these documents and he gave a story of the last days in the Bunker. Lorenz’s story was checked against all available evidence and appeared to be entirely reliable. The signatures on the documents were compared with other signatures of Hitler, Bormann, and Goebbels and pronounced by an expert to be genuine. They were also shown to Otto Dietrich, Hitler’s Press Chief, and were immediately recognized by him.[6] The members of the 3rd British Counter-Intelligence Section were then given strict orders that the arrest of Lorenz should in no way be discussed outside the section and above all it should not be leaked to the press.[7]

The British knew that of the two people Lorenz identified, Johannmeier was believed to have been in the bunker, and to have left it shortly before Hitler’s death; but nothing further was known about Zander. However, in his interrogations Lorenz gave enough information to trace Zander, as well as Johannmeier.[8]

Hugh Trevor-Roper, who had spent October in Germany tracking down evidence of Hitler’s death, had been in Oxford only about ten days when he received a telephone call from Bad Oeynhausen informing him that a document had been found, which appeared to be Hitler’s will. He had already seen a telegram referring to a “personal testament” among Doenitz’s papers, so he was predisposed to believe it to be genuine. He was soon able to examine it himself, after a photostatic copy was couriered to him. Accompanying this personal testament was a political testament. Also attached was an appendix signed by Goebbels. Trevor-Roper flew to Germany to resume his Hitler investigation. He did so believing that the sets of documents carried by Johannmeier and Zander could be traced, this would establish authenticity of the wills beyond doubt.[9]

Trevor-Roper had never heard of Zander, but was familiar with the name Johannmeier, whom he knew to have been on Burgdorf’s staff. Johannmeier was traced living quietly with his parents in Iserlohn, in the British Zone of Occupation, some 90 miles southeast of Bad Oeynhausen. Trevor-Roper had him detained on December 20 and interrogated. He denied everything, and his interrogator, a twenty-two year old captain, was inclined to release him. Dissatisfied, Trevor-Roper decided to go to Iserlohn to interrogate Johannmeier himself. Eventually, after long questioning, Johannmeier admitted that he had been in the bunker, but he continued to deny any knowledge of Hitler’s will. His story was that he had been ordered to escort Lorenz and Zander through Russian lines. He understood them to be carrying documents, but claimed to be ignorant of what these were. Even when shown the copies he insisted that he had never seen them before. He was a simple soldier, no more. Frustrated, Trevor-Roper gave orders that Johannmeier should be kept in detention over the Christmas period. Trevor-Roper knew that further progress was not possible till further evidence could be obtained from Zander.[10]

Trevor-Roper then returned to Bad Oeynhausen. There he heard from British Major Peter Ramsbotham that the military high-ups were panicking: no one wanted the responsibility of deciding what to do about Hitler’s will. The decision had been passed up the line to the Joint Intelligence Committee in London. “This is an historical document,” Ramsbotham said, “who are these brass-hats that they should feebly demand the suppression of historical documents?” Equally exasperated, Trevor-Roper made a bold proposal. Zander’s home was in Munich, in the American Zone. “Give me a car, for ten days, and I will look for Zander, and if I should find him and his documents I should of course have to hand the documents over to the American authorities; and if they should choose not to suppress but to publish them, that would be too bad, but it would be no business of ours: for the choice is theirs.”[11] Trevor-Roper would indeed be going to Munich where he would meet American Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC) agent Arnold Hans Weiss, who was also on the trail of Zander.

While Trevor-Roper was conducting his investigation, Weiss and his counterintelligence team, working out of an office in Munich, were similarly charged with hunting down members of Hitler’s inner circle and finding evidence of Hitler’s death. Weiss was born Hans Arnold Wangersheim on July 25, 1924, to a middle-class family of assimilated Jews that had lived in Franconia for nearly four centuries. He was six when his parents divorced in 1930. His mother Thekla Rosenberg took custody of Weiss and his two sisters. Their father provided no financial support. On her bookkeeper’s salary she could not afford to raise three children, so kept the two sisters and sent Arnold in either 1930 or 1931 to an Orthodox Jewish orphanage in Furth, near Nuremberg. He got to see his mother and sisters for a few hours every few months and his maternal grandmother’s apartment was within walking distance and he visited her at least once a week. One of his classmates was Henry Kissinger, who had been born in Furth in 1923.[12]

Weiss fled Germany in 1938, as did the Kissinger family, after his bar mitzvah and made his way to the United States with the help of a Quaker group. He only had a cardboard suitcase and $5, and did not speak a word of English or know a single person. He eventually was taken in by a family from Janesville, Wisconsin. After high school he went to a watchmaker’s college. Later, he was able to help get his mother and sisters to the United States. In 1942, he joined the United States Army Air Corps as a B-17 gunner. During a crash landing he broke both his legs, and because of his German language skills, soon found himself joining the Army’s Counterintelligence Corps.[13]

Weiss returned to Nuremberg in the spring of 1945 with the 45th Division. He helped liberate Dachau, where he learned that his father had been there and would learn later he had survived and immigrated to Brazil with a new wife. Later he learned that his grandmother had been taken to Auschwitz and did not survive.[14]

Now, Weiss in the fall, with CIC special agent Rosener, was on the trail of Martin Bormann and other top Nazis that may have survived and been hiding in the American Zone. Weiss vaguely knew that Bormann’s adjutant was from Munich. Weiss scoured the records and discovered that his adjutant, Wilhelm Zander, indeed hailed from Munich, and was still unaccounted for. Zander not only might know where Bormann was hiding, as there was a good chance that he had been in the bunker just before the Red Army stormed it. Weiss rounded up his mother and sister who told him that Zander had a 21-year old girlfriend living in Munich and Weiss had her arrested. She told him that she had been Zander’s lover and that she had seen him six weeks earlier. She told Weiss the alias Zander was using and where he was hiding. Weiss immediately sent a message to CIC headquarters in Frankfurt. It notified British intelligence, which dispatched Trevor-Roper to join Weiss in the chase.[15] This was probably on or about December 20.

The Allies had no trace of Zander since he had left the bunker and began his travels with Lorenz and Johannmeier, that is, until Weiss was able to obtain information about him. By all accounts from his parents-in-law in Hanover and from his wife and her circle in Munich, Zander was missing, never having reached his home in Munich after separating from Lorenz in Hanover. Frau Zander produced elaborate evidence of this and of her own genuine desire to discover news of him, by naming all his other relatives, producing photographs and references, and other evidence. All of this was designed to mislead the hunters. Information contained in the files of the Munich CIC office in the fall indicated that Zander was presumed to be dead.[16]

Apparently at the end of June or beginning of July Zander began working as a landscaper for some time and as a janitor in Tegernsee. In August Ilsa Unterholzner[17], who had been one of Bormann’s secretaries, by chance met Zander, whom she had known, at Tegernsee where Zander was then working as a gardener. In October Unterholzner went to Aidenbach (about 100 miles northeast of Tegernsee) to visit her sister, Mrs. Schmidt, and then invited Zander to spend his Christmas vacation with them in Aidenbach. Zander left Tegernsee on December 22 for Aidenbach in company of Unterholzner, who had apparently been visiting her sister-in-law in Tegernsee.  Before making the trip to Aidenbach, Zander gave Unterholzner’s sister-in-law, Irmgard Unterholzner, at Tegernsee, a suitcase containing the documents and told her to keep it until his return.[18]

Meanwhile, Trevor-Roper set out for the American Zone, probably on or about December 21.[19]


Footnotes

[1] Memorandum, Arnold H. Weiss, Special Agent, CIC, Munich Sub-Regional Office to the Officer in Charge, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Re: Location and Arrest and Recovery of Hitler’s Documents, December 30, 1945, attachment to Memorandum, 1st Lt. Marvin L. Edwards, CIC, Commanding to Commanding Officer, 970/CIC, Regional Office IV, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Adjutant to Bormann; Unterholzner, Ilsa, secretary to Bormann, January 4, 1946; 1st Indorsement, 1st Lt. Joseph E. Gagan, Executive, CIC Region, IV to Chief, CIC, CIB, Headquarters, USFET, January 4, 1946, File: D011874, Zander, Willi [Wilhelm], Personal Name File, Security Classified Intelligence and Investigative Dossiers, 1939-1976, (NAID 645054) Record Group 319; Third Interrogation of Willi Johannmeier, January 1, 1946, at CIB, BAOR [British Army of the Rhine], File: XE013274, Willi Johannmeier, ibid.; H. R. Trevor-Roper, The Last Days of Hitler (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1947), pp. 219-220; Adam Sisman, Hugh Trevor-Roper: The Biography (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2010), p. 139.

[2] Memorandum, Arnold H. Weiss, Special Agent, CIC, Munich Sub-Regional Office  to the Officer in Charge, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Re: Location and Arrest and Recovery of Hitler’s Documents, December 30, 1945, attachment to Memorandum, 1st Lt. Marvin L. Edwards, CIC, Commanding to Commanding Officer, 970/CIC, Regional Office IV, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Adjutant to Bormann; Unterholzner, Ilsa, secretary to Bormann, January 4, 1946; 1st Indorsement, 1st Lt. Joseph E. Gagan, Executive, CIC Region, IV to Chief, CIC, CIB, Headquarters, USFET, January 4, 1946, File: D011874, Zander, Willi [Wilhelm], Personal Name File, Security Classified Intelligence and Investigative Dossiers, 1939-1976, (NAID 645054) Record Group 319; Memorandum, 2nd Lt. Edgar A. Zaharia, Civilian Internment Camp No. 6, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division to Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Headquarters United States Forces, European Theater (Main), Attn: Chief, CIB, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, April 20, 1946, ibid.; Col. C. R. Tuff, Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Allied Force Headquarters, Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 60, For week ending February 27, 1946, Part II-General Intelligence, “The Discovery of Hitler’s Wills,” [based on information supplied by Control Commission (BE) Intelligence Bureau] File: Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary, Allied Force Headquarters, Publications (“P”) Files, 1946-1951, Document Library Branch, Administrative Division, Assistant Chief of Staff (G-2), Intelligence, ibid.; Memorandum, Col. Edward M. Fickett, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Third United States Army to Office of the U.S. Chief of Counsel, International Military Tribunal, Subject: Circumstances of Discovery of Hitler’s Wills, January 11, 1946, Hitler’s Private Testament and Political Testament, April 29, 1945, File: 3569-PS, United States Evidence, 1945-46, (NAID 305264) Record Group 238; Col. Edward M. Fickett, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Third U.S. Army, Section C, Appendix III, G-2 Section, Report for the Month of December 1945, p. 9, File: G-2 Section, Headquarters, Third United States Army, Quarterly “Report of Operations,” 4 October-31 December 1945, Appendix III, Historical Division; Program Files; Third U.S. Army; G-2; Operations Reports, 1945-1947, (NAID 5896761) Record Group 498; Memorandum, 1st Lt. Allen Fial, 303 CIC Det, Headquarters, Third United States Army to Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Third United States Army, Subject: Documents in Luggage of Wilhelm Zander, Alias Friedrich Wilhelm Paustin, December 28, 1945, File: 370.2 1945, Captured Documents, 1945, Classified Decimal File, (NAID 5674542) Administrative Branch, G-2 Section, ibid.; Trevor-Roper, The Last Days of Hitler, p. 220; Herman Rothman, ed. by Helen Fry, Hitler’s Will, The History Press (Glocestershire, United Kingdom, 2009), pp. 101, 103. In his December 30, 1945, report Arnold H. Weiss indicates at one point that Zander was in Munich May 28-30 and in another part of the same report that Zander was in Tegernsee on those days. Most likely Zander was in Munich May 28-30, before going to Tegernsee.

[3] Col. C. R. Tuff, Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Allied Force Headquarters, Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 60, For week ending February 27, 1946, Part II-General Intelligence, “The Discovery of Hitler’s Wills,” [based on information supplied by Control Commission (BE) Intelligence Bureau] File: Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary, Allied Force Headquarters, Publications (“P”) Files, 1950-1951 (NAID 656424) Record Group 319; Rothman, Hitler’s Will, pp.  88-90, 98-100, 101, 103, 108; Sisman, Hugh Trevor-Roper, pp. 138-139.

[4] Rothman, Hitler’s Will, pp. 104, 105.

[5] Rothman, Hitler’s Will, pp. 106, 107.

[6] Col. C. R. Tuff, Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Allied Force Headquarters, Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 60, For week ending February 27, 1946, Part II-General Intelligence, “The Discovery of Hitler’s Wills,” [based on information supplied by Control Commission (BE) Intelligence Bureau] File: Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary, Allied Force Headquarters, Publications (“P”) Files, 1950-1951 (NAID 656424) Record Group 319; Rothman, Hitler’s Will, pp. 101, 102, 103; Sisman, Hugh Trevor-Roper, p. 139.

[7] Rothman, Hitler’s Will, pp. 103-104.

[8] Col. C. R. Tuff, Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Allied Force Headquarters, Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 60, For week ending February 27, 1946, Part II-General Intelligence, “The Discovery of Hitler’s Wills,” [based on information supplied by Control Commission (BE) Intelligence Bureau] File: Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary, Allied Force Headquarters, Publications (“P”) Files, 1950-1951 (NAID 656424) Record Group 319; Rothman, Hitler’s Will, p. 108.

[9] Sisman, Hugh Trevor-Roper, pp. 138, 139; Richard Davenport-Hines, ed., Hugh Trevor-Roper: The Wartime Journals (London and New York: I. B. Tauris, 2015), p. 274.

[10] Col. C. R. Tuff, Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Allied Force Headquarters, Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 60, For week ending February 27, 1946, Part II-General Intelligence, “The Discovery of Hitler’s Wills,” [based on information supplied by Control Commission (BE) Intelligence Bureau] File: Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary, Allied Force Headquarters, Publications (“P”) Files, 1950-1951 (NAID 656424) Record Group 319; Sisman, Hugh Trevor-Roper, p. 139; Davenport-Hines, ed., Hugh Trevor-Roper: The Wartime Journals, p. 275; Concerning the Report of the British intelligence Service About Hitler’s Last Days, Tass News Agency, January 1, 1946, in V. K. Vinogrado, J. F. Pogonyi, and N. V. Teptzov, Hitler’s Death: Russia’s Last Great Secret from the Files of the KGB (London: Chaucer Press, 2005), p. 295.

[11] Sisman, Hugh Trevor-Roper, pp. 139-140; Davenport-Hines, ed., Hugh Trevor-Roper: The Wartime Journals, p. 276.

[12] Matthew Brzezinski, “Giving Hitler Hell,” The Washington Post Sunday Magazine, July 24, 2005; Bruce Weber, “Arnold Weiss Dies at 86; helped to Find Hitler’s Will,” The New York Times, January 1, 2011, p. A22.

[13] Matthew Brzezinski, “Giving Hitler Hell,” The Washington Post Sunday Magazine, July 24, 2005; Bruce Weber, “Arnold Weiss Dies at 86; helped to Find Hitler’s Will,” The New York Times, January 1, 2011, p. A22; T. Rees Shapiro, “German-born U.S. Solder found Hitler’s last will and testament,” The Washington Post, December 10, 2010, p. B7.

[14] Matthew Brzezinski, “Giving Hitler Hell,” The Washington Post Sunday Magazine, July 24, 2005.

[15] Ada Petrova and Peter Watson, The Death of Hitler: The Full Story with New Evidence from Secret Russian Archives (New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company, 1996), p. 17; Matthew Brzezinski, “Giving Hitler Hell,” The Washington Post Sunday Magazine, July 24, 2005.

[16] Col. C. R. Tuff, Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Allied Force Headquarters, Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 60, For week ending February 27, 1946, Part II-General Intelligence, “The Discovery of Hitler’s Wills,” [based on information supplied by Control Commission (BE) Intelligence Bureau] File: Combined Weekly Intelligence Summary, Allied Force Headquarters, Publications (“P”) Files, 1950-1951 (NAID 656424) Record Group 319; Memorandum, Arnold H. Weiss, Special Agent, CIC, Munich Sub-Regional Office  to the Officer in Charge, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Re: Location and Arrest and Recovery of Hitler’s Documents, December 30, 1945, attachment to Memorandum, 1st Lt. Marvin L. Edwards, CIC, Commanding to Commanding Officer, 970/CIC, Regional Office IV, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Adjutant to Bormann; Unterholzner, Ilsa, secretary to Bormann, January 4, 1946; 1st Indorsement, 1st Lt. Joseph E. Gagan, Executive, CIC Region, IV to Chief, CIC, CIB, Headquarters, USFET, January 4, 1946, File: D011874, Zander, Willi [Wilhelm], Personal Name File, Security Classified Intelligence and Investigative Dossiers, 1939-1976, (NAID 645054) Record Group 319.

[17] Ilsa Unterholzner, born February 22, 1921, in July 1937 accepted the position of typist at the Gauleitung for the Gau Westmark at Neustadt. She worked there until January 1, 1939 when she accepted a position at the Party Chancellery in Munich. She joined the Nazi Party on September 1, 1939.  In August 1944 she was transferred to the office of Bormann in Berlin where she worked as secretary for Bormann and accompanied him when he transferred the Party offices to the Fuehrer Headquarters in East Prussia. In December 1944 the Party chancellery was moved back to Berlin along with the Fuehrer Headquarters and she worked in Berlin, in the office of Bormann until April 22. On that day she was flown from Berlin to Obersalzberg to continue her work there. From April 25 to October 10 she worked on various farms in the vicinity of Berchtesgaden. Memorandum, Arnold H. Weiss, Special Agent, CIC, Munich Sub-Regional Office  to the Officer in Charge, Subject: Unterholzner, Ilsa, Re: Secretary of Martin Bormann, December 30, 1945, attachment to Memorandum, 1st Lt. Marvin L. Edwards, CIC, Commanding to Commanding Officer, 970/CIC, Regional Office IV, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Adjutant to Bormann; Unterholzner, Ilsa, secretary to Bormann, January 4, 1946; 1st Indorsement, 1st Lt. Joseph E. Gagan, Executive, CIC Region, IV to Chief, CIC, CIB, Headquarters, USFET, January 4, 1946, File: D011874, Zander, Willi [Wilhelm], Personal Name File, Security Classified Intelligence and Investigative Dossiers, 1939-1976, (NAID 645054) Record Group 319.

[18] Memorandum, Arnold H. Weiss, Special Agent, CIC, Munich Sub-Regional Office  to the Officer in Charge, Subject: Unterholzner, Ilsa, Re: Secretary of Martin Bormann, December 30, 1945, attachment to Memorandum, 1st Lt. Marvin L. Edwards, CIC, Commanding to Commanding Officer, 970/CIC, Regional Office IV, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Adjutant to Bormann; Unterholzner, Ilsa, secretary to Bormann, January 4, 1946; 1st Indorsement, 1st Lt. Joseph E. Gagan, Executive, CIC Region, IV to Chief, CIC, CIB, Headquarters, USFET, January 4, 1946, File: D011874, Zander, Willi [Wilhelm], Personal Name File, Security Classified Intelligence and Investigative Dossiers, 1939-1976, (NAID 645054) Record Group 319; Memorandum, Arnold H. Weiss, Special Agent, CIC, Munich Sub-Regional Office  to the Officer in Charge, Subject: Zander, Wilhelm, alias Paustin, Friedrich Wilhelm, Re: Location and Arrest and Recovery of Hitler’s Documents, December 30, 1945, ibid.

[19] Sisman, Hugh Trevor-Roper, p. 140.

This entry was posted in Archives II, Military Records, World War II and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.