“How about a little football game?” The Albuquerque Indian School’s Dominating Football Run, 1926-1931

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records. A new exhibit showcasing the impact sports have had on America has opened at the National Archives Museum. All American: The Power of Sports spans centuries of United States history and features more than 75 original items from … Continue reading “How about a little football game?” The Albuquerque Indian School’s Dominating Football Run, 1926-1931

An Indigenous Woman’s Legal Fight After Forced Sterilization

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Special thanks to Rose Buchanan and Cody White, Subject Matter Experts for Native American Related Records, for their feedback and expertise during the process of writing this post. The following piece along with associated archival records discuss forced sterilization, racist slurs … Continue reading An Indigenous Woman’s Legal Fight After Forced Sterilization

Establishing and Disbanding the Neah Bay Settlement, 1792

Part III of the blog series 225 Years Ago: Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Spanish Settlement in Washington State, Núñez Gaona (Neah Bay), 1792 Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Spanish naval Lieutenant Salvador Fidalgo, in the Princesa, left San Blas … Continue reading Establishing and Disbanding the Neah Bay Settlement, 1792

Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Nootka Sound Settlement, 1790-1791

Part II of the blog series 225 Years Ago: Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Spanish Settlement in Washington State, Núñez Gaona (Neah Bay), 1792 Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Because of Spain’s growing concerns about its sovereignty over the Pacific … Continue reading Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Nootka Sound Settlement, 1790-1791

“We’re not as bad as we look”: Girls’ Education at the Albuquerque Indian School

Today's post is written by Jennifer Eltringham, an intern at the National Archives at Denver. The Albuquerque Indian School was founded in in 1881 during a push to assimilate Native Americans into mainstream American culture through education at off-reservation boarding schools. By removing children from their families and culture, educators hoped to “Kill the Indian, save … Continue reading “We’re not as bad as we look”: Girls’ Education at the Albuquerque Indian School

From Scouting for Custer to Farming the Plains; The Life and Times of Hairy Moccasin as Seen in the Crow Indian Agency Records

Today's post was written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. On February 28th, 1876, four Crow Indians enlisted in the U.S. Army as Indian Scouts at Fort Ellis Montana. Those four men: Curly, Goes Ahead, White Man Runs Him, and Hairy Moccasin, were under the command of Colonel Gibbons when on … Continue reading From Scouting for Custer to Farming the Plains; The Life and Times of Hairy Moccasin as Seen in the Crow Indian Agency Records

Civil Records at Archives I

By T. Juliette Arai "What records do you have here?" is a common question we are asked everyday at Archives I (AI) in Washington, DC.  This post -- Part 3 of a 3-part series -- provides a brief description of the civilian agency records one can find in DC.  Part 1, Army [records at AI], and … Continue reading Civil Records at Archives I