Propaganda, Politics, and the Personification of FDR: The Uncle Sam Poster Controversy

This is the third and final post in a three-part series on the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In October 1943, Representative Harold Knutson (R-MN) charged the U.S. … Continue reading Propaganda, Politics, and the Personification of FDR: The Uncle Sam Poster Controversy

The Uncle Sam “Hush” Poster and the One That Never Was

This is the second of three posts about the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Uncle Sam by Leon Helguera (left). Uncle Sam by Robert S. Sloan (right). Today, … Continue reading The Uncle Sam “Hush” Poster and the One That Never Was

“I’m Counting on You” by Leon Helguera: A Mexican Artist Puts His Stamp on Uncle Sam

This is the first of three posts about the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In 1943, Mexican born artist Leon Helguera was commissioned by the U.S. Office of … Continue reading “I’m Counting on You” by Leon Helguera: A Mexican Artist Puts His Stamp on Uncle Sam

A poster depicting two hands saluting with an Uncle Sam hat and a Mexican sombrero.

Americans All by Leon Helguera: Appealing to Hispanics on the Home Front in World War II

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In the holdings of the National Archives and Presidential Libraries there are many pictures that reflect the American experience. The image of Rosie the Riveter in - We Can Do it, or Uncle Sam … Continue reading Americans All by Leon Helguera: Appealing to Hispanics on the Home Front in World War II

Watching Out for Your Friends: 1942 Guidance for U.S. Propaganda in the Pacific During World War II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. As numerous scholars have demonstrated, World War II in the Pacific had a distinct racial aspect to it.[1]  The Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor reinforced a long-standing strand of American racial animosity towards … Continue reading Watching Out for Your Friends: 1942 Guidance for U.S. Propaganda in the Pacific During World War II

The Importance of Australia, 1941

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Australia is, today, a vital ally of the United States.  As the Department of State's February 2017 factsheet on relations with Australia notes, the relationship is "underpinned by shared democratic values, common interests, and … Continue reading The Importance of Australia, 1941

British Opinion About The United States After Pearl Harbor

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. World War II began on September 1, 1939, with the German invasion of Poland.  France and Great Britain, fulfilling their international obligations, declared war on Germany but could do little to aid the Poles … Continue reading British Opinion About The United States After Pearl Harbor

War of Words: Race-Based Propaganda During World War II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. World War II was not only a war of battleships and bullets.  Words, in the form of overt and covert propaganda and psychological warfare, played an important role.  See the post Airplanes over France for examples … Continue reading War of Words: Race-Based Propaganda During World War II

Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. During World War II, the U.S. government produced propaganda films to rally public support.  Among the most famous of those motion pictures is Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress released in 1944.  The … Continue reading Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress

Poster Appreciate America Do Your Share

“Fake News” 1942: President Roosevelt and the Chicago Tribune

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park During the first months of 1942, two individuals in the Office of Facts and Figures, within the Office for Emergency Management of the Executive Office of the President, drew up lists of newspapers critical of the Roosevelt Administration.[1] … Continue reading “Fake News” 1942: President Roosevelt and the Chicago Tribune