An American Car on the Road in the USSR, 1972

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The tight restrictions on travelers in the USSR closed more than 97% of that country to most foreigners.  The travel restrictions particularly affected diplomats from the Western Powers.  Nevertheless, from time to time, staff of … Continue reading An American Car on the Road in the USSR, 1972

The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Paris

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, often referred to as the “Spanish flu,” was the greatest pandemic of the 20th Century.  It killed upwards of 50 million people worldwide, striking without regard to country or social … Continue reading The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Paris

Tony Curtis on Creating Good Will for America: 1956

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In 1956, Tony Curtis was an up-and-coming actor.  In a career stretching from the 1940s to the 2000s, he starred in both dramatic and comedic films.  By 1956, he had had some success in such … Continue reading Tony Curtis on Creating Good Will for America: 1956

The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Philadelphia

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, often referred to as the “Spanish flu,” was the greatest pandemic of the 20th Century.  It killed upwards of 50 million people worldwide, striking without regard to country or … Continue reading The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Philadelphia

Recognizing Women in Foreign Affairs, 1957

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In 1957, the U.S. Foreign Service had relatively few women members and up to that date only seven women had ever held the position of Minister or Ambassador (head of a diplomatic post).  The … Continue reading Recognizing Women in Foreign Affairs, 1957

Reading the Riot Act: American Reaction to Leaks in the Foreign Press

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The leak of sensitive information to the American press is a perpetual problem for U.S. Government officials.  See here, here, and here for earlier posts on that subject.  The U.S. government, however, is not … Continue reading Reading the Riot Act: American Reaction to Leaks in the Foreign Press

Diplomatic Reporting

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. American diplomats overseas have many functions.  Perhaps the most important is to serve as eyes and ears of the United States and reporting what they learn and what they think it means.  At various … Continue reading Diplomatic Reporting

Soviet Intelligence in the United States, 1971

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The extent of Soviet espionage in the United States was a perpetual question of the Cold War.  From the time of the Bolshevik Revolution in November 1917, but especially during the Great Depression, many … Continue reading Soviet Intelligence in the United States, 1971

Space: The Final Frontier (this is not a Star Trek story)

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In any large organization, the location and size of office space is telling.  The large corner office, the office on the top floor, the office next to a senior official all connote power and … Continue reading Space: The Final Frontier (this is not a Star Trek story)

Dean Rusk Remembers World War II, 1968

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Dean Rusk served as Secretary of State from January 1961 to January 1969, the second longest tenure in that job in U.S. history.  As with many men of his generation, he saw military service … Continue reading Dean Rusk Remembers World War II, 1968