Prepare for Collision! The Ramming of the USS Growler and a Japanese Gunboat

Today’s post is by Nathanial Patch, Reference Archivist and Subject Matter Expert for Navy Records at the National Archives in College Park, MD. January 1943, while on her fourth war patrol, the USS Growler (SS 215) from Brisbane, Australia, had been patrolling the sea lanes to Rabaul on the western end of New Ireland, she … Continue reading Prepare for Collision! The Ramming of the USS Growler and a Japanese Gunboat

The Kamikaze Attack on the USS Braine, May 27, 1945

Today’s post is by Joseph P. Keefe, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Boston. The USS Braine was a twenty-one-ton Fletcher class destroyer which had been built and launched at the Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine in March of 1943. Following her participation in General Douglas MacArthur’s campaign to retake the Philippines, the … Continue reading The Kamikaze Attack on the USS Braine, May 27, 1945

Gordon Gilkey: A Man for All Seasons

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. At the beginning of my freshman year at Oregon State University, I went to see the Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences (now Liberal Arts) to discuss with him the courses I should be … Continue reading Gordon Gilkey: A Man for All Seasons

image of virginia hall

The Secrets of the Office of Strategic Services Personnel Records: Spotlight on Virginia Hall

Today’s post is by Cara Moore Lebonick, Archives Reference Specialist at the National Archives at St. Louis In 1931 Virginia Hall, born this month, was appointed as a “Clerk” for the U.S. Department of State, to be stationed in Warsaw. She failed the “career service” exam twice, once in 1929 and again in 1930, before … Continue reading The Secrets of the Office of Strategic Services Personnel Records: Spotlight on Virginia Hall

The Closed Door of Justice: African American Nurses and the Fight for Naval Service

Today's post is written by Alicia Henneberry, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Commissioning ceremony in which Phyllis Dailey, second from right, became the first black nurse in the Navy Nursing Corps. March 8, 1945. NAID 520618. In October 1908, twenty nurses reported for duty at the Naval Medical School Hospital … Continue reading The Closed Door of Justice: African American Nurses and the Fight for Naval Service

Dean Rusk Remembers World War II, 1968

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Dean Rusk served as Secretary of State from January 1961 to January 1969, the second longest tenure in that job in U.S. history.  As with many men of his generation, he saw military service … Continue reading Dean Rusk Remembers World War II, 1968

The War after the War: the American Indian Fight for the Vote after WWII

Today's post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records “We all know Congress granted the Indian citizenship in 1924, but we still have no privilege to vote, we do not understand what kind of citizenship you would call that.” - Pvt. … Continue reading The War after the War: the American Indian Fight for the Vote after WWII

Propaganda, Politics, and the Personification of FDR: The Uncle Sam Poster Controversy

This is the third and final post in a three-part series on the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In October 1943, Representative Harold Knutson (R-MN) charged the U.S. … Continue reading Propaganda, Politics, and the Personification of FDR: The Uncle Sam Poster Controversy

The Uncle Sam “Hush” Poster and the One That Never Was

This is the second of three posts about the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Uncle Sam by Leon Helguera (left). Uncle Sam by Robert S. Sloan (right). Today, … Continue reading The Uncle Sam “Hush” Poster and the One That Never Was

“I’m Counting on You” by Leon Helguera: A Mexican Artist Puts His Stamp on Uncle Sam

This is the first of three posts about the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In 1943, Mexican born artist Leon Helguera was commissioned by the U.S. Office of … Continue reading “I’m Counting on You” by Leon Helguera: A Mexican Artist Puts His Stamp on Uncle Sam