The Kamikaze Attack on the USS Braine, May 27, 1945

Today’s post is by Joseph P. Keefe, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Boston. The USS Braine was a twenty-one-ton Fletcher class destroyer which had been built and launched at the Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine in March of 1943. Following her participation in General Douglas MacArthur’s campaign to retake the Philippines, the … Continue reading The Kamikaze Attack on the USS Braine, May 27, 1945

The United States vs the Ship Bat: A Civil War Prize Case

Today’s post is by Joseph P. Keefe, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Boston. When the American Civil War broke out on April 12, 1861, the newly formed Confederate States of America had no ships to speak of in its navy. In the months leading up to the war, the Confederate government sought the … Continue reading The United States vs the Ship Bat: A Civil War Prize Case

Architectural Drawing of a lighthouse showing a plan and elevation view. National Archives Identifier: 85967585

Winslow Lewis and the Expansion of Early Federal Lighthouses

By Andrew Begley, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Boston When the First Congress passed “An Act for the establishment and support of Lighthouses, Beacons, Buoys, and Public Piers” on August 7, 1789, there were only twelve lighthouses illuminating the shores of the newly formed nation. By 1842, that number had grown to 250. … Continue reading Winslow Lewis and the Expansion of Early Federal Lighthouses

Over 650 Newly Digitized Navy Logbooks in the National Archives Catalog

Today's post was written by Gina Perry, Archives Specialist at the National Archives in Washington, DC It was 70 degrees early in the morning on April 24, 1862, according to that day’s entry in the logbook of the U.S.S. Hartford, as the ship sailed its way up the mouth of the Mississippi River: “From 4 … Continue reading Over 650 Newly Digitized Navy Logbooks in the National Archives Catalog

Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division, Part II

Today's post was written by Jan Hodges, volunteer at the National Archives at College Park, MD. This is a continuation from Part I. Bleary eyed American soldiers were jolted to full wakefulness by the tremendous noise of the barrage in a fog created by nature and intensified by haze from exploding shells.  Both explosive and … Continue reading Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division, Part II

Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division

Today's post is by Jan Hodges, volunteer at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In April 1918, after World War I had ground along for nearly four years, the 26th Division of the American army was assigned to the front lines under French command.  A large German raid on April 20th penetrated the American … Continue reading Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division

photograph of man, Ralph S. Mosher, looking at a quadruped model.

Bringing Sci-Fi to Life: The Walking War Machines of ARPA and G.E.

Today’s post is by Jeff Simon who interned with the Textual Processing Department at the National Archives in College Park, MD in the summer of 2019 A walking engine of glittering metal, striding now across the heather; articulate ropes of steel dangling from it, and the clattering tumult of its passage mingling with the riot … Continue reading Bringing Sci-Fi to Life: The Walking War Machines of ARPA and G.E.

The Closed Door of Justice: African American Nurses and the Fight for Naval Service

Today's post is written by Alicia Henneberry, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Commissioning ceremony in which Phyllis Dailey, second from right, became the first black nurse in the Navy Nursing Corps. March 8, 1945. NAID 520618. In October 1908, twenty nurses reported for duty at the Naval Medical School Hospital … Continue reading The Closed Door of Justice: African American Nurses and the Fight for Naval Service

APOLLO 11: Preparing for the Unthinkable

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park.  An earlier post described the involvement of the Department of State with manned spacecraft launches.  Among other things, it discussed the possibility of a mission-related disaster that forced an aborted landing on the land … Continue reading APOLLO 11: Preparing for the Unthinkable

Painting of the events of July 30, 1909.

The First Woman to Fly in an Aeroplane in the United States, October 27, 1909

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. The periodical Aeronautics in its issue of December 1909 reproduced the official log of all the aeroplane flights undertaken at the United States Army Signal Corps aviation field at College Park, Maryland between October 8 and November … Continue reading The First Woman to Fly in an Aeroplane in the United States, October 27, 1909