Black and white photograph of a ship

Over 500 Logbooks of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Ships Now Available in the National Archives Catalog

Today’s post was written by Gina Kim Perry, Archivist in Digitization Archival Services at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. USC&GSS Hassler (1893), named after Ferdinand Rudolph Hassler, who was appointed by President Thomas Jefferson as the first head of the Survey of Coast in 1807 (NOAA Photo Library) Introduction Newly available in the National Archives … Continue reading Over 500 Logbooks of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Ships Now Available in the National Archives Catalog

Mainbocher: Designer of the “Best Dressed Women in the World”

Mainbocher, alongside Cmdr. Aileen Griffin, arriving in Dallas, TX for the 1960 WAVES Reunion (NAID 6328623) It was July 1960 and the city of Dallas, Texas was playing host to thousands of Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service, who were in town to celebrate the 18th National Reunion of their historic unit. Established in 1942, … Continue reading Mainbocher: Designer of the “Best Dressed Women in the World”

Documenting the Deceased: Typhoid Fever During the Spanish-American War

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. While the Spanish-American War lasted four months (April 21 – August 13, 1898), it resulted in almost 2,500 deaths of American soldiers.[1] The short-lived conflict officially came to a close with the Treaty of Paris, which was signed on December 10, … Continue reading Documenting the Deceased: Typhoid Fever During the Spanish-American War

BENEATH HIS SHIRT SLEEVES: Evidence of Injury, Part II

Tintype Images of Wounded Civil War Union Soldiers from Pension Application Files in the U.S. National Archives This is the second of two posts about personal tintype images of wounded soldiers in the Civil War Pension Application Files from the Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs (Record Group 15).  **Please note that the following … Continue reading BENEATH HIS SHIRT SLEEVES: Evidence of Injury, Part II

New Web Page for Digitized U.S. Navy Logs Through 1940

Images of the USS Bear, USS Jeannette, and the USS Monitor from NOAA and US Naval History and Heritage Command Imagine the ability to time travel virtually from the comfort of your home as you read on your computer or cell phone about: an Arctic rescue mission as it unfolded on the deck of the U.S.S. … Continue reading New Web Page for Digitized U.S. Navy Logs Through 1940

Text Message Top 5 of 2021

Please enjoy this countdown of our most popular blog posts of 2021. Thank you for continuing to read the Text Message and we hope you join us for more stories, insights, and highlights from the textual records of the National Archives in 2022! #5 "Lucy, I'm Home!"... from the Army Armed Forces Newsmap, vol 1, … Continue reading Text Message Top 5 of 2021

“Outsiders” in the United States Army during the American War for Independence

Today’s post is by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland.  Throughout the U.S. Army’s history there have been political and social issues surrounding the recruitment and utilization of “outsiders,” people who were not like the majority of white and native-born soldiers with whom they served. This post takes … Continue reading “Outsiders” in the United States Army during the American War for Independence

Enlist in the Navy poster

SNACing with the PEPs: Discovering Henry Reuterdahl and his Compelling Artistic Relationship with the U. S. Navy

Today’s post is by Sarah Rigdon, an Archives Technician in the Research Room in the National Archives at St. Louis, MO. Like so many National Archives staff during the COVID-19 pandemic, I began searching for telework projects and creative ways to connect others with the records available to me in our Catalog, particularly in the … Continue reading SNACing with the PEPs: Discovering Henry Reuterdahl and his Compelling Artistic Relationship with the U. S. Navy

Tony Dedman school portrait

Remembering Tony Dedman

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records 58,318. That’s how many names are carved into the reflective black marble of the wall, or were as of 2017 according to the National Park Service. Today, I just want to talk … Continue reading Remembering Tony Dedman

Operation JACK STAY: US Marines in the Forest of Assassins

Today’s post is by Nathanial Patch, Reference Archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD and Subject Matter Expert for Navy Records. Section I: Enemy at the Outskirts On February 27, 1966, the Panamanian cargo ship, SS Lorinda, was sailing up the Long Tau River heading towards Saigon. The Long Tau is the deep … Continue reading Operation JACK STAY: US Marines in the Forest of Assassins