The National Commission on Law Observance and Enforcement’s Report on Lawlessness in Law Enforcement

Today’s post is by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Introduction In 1929, President Hoover established a commission to undertake the first comprehensive national study of crime, the American criminal justice system, and law enforcement in the United States. This commission in the two years that followed would … Continue reading The National Commission on Law Observance and Enforcement’s Report on Lawlessness in Law Enforcement

The Adventures of Miriam Davenport, 1940-1946, Part II

Today’s post is by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In 1944, Miriam Davenport Treo was employed by the Committee of the American Council of Learned Societies for the Protection of Cultural Treasures in War Areas to prepare maps and lists of cultural treasures for the Armed Forces … Continue reading The Adventures of Miriam Davenport, 1940-1946, Part II

The Adventures of Miriam Davenport, 1940-1946, Part I

Today’s post is by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In October 1945, Miriam Davenport reported to work at Tier 18 W in the National Archives Building at 7th and Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington D.C. She was not, however, an employee of the National Archives. She was employed … Continue reading The Adventures of Miriam Davenport, 1940-1946, Part I

The Decentralization of Archives Debate and National Archives Independence, 1979-1984

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In going through my old files in the process of retiring I ran across information regarding the debate about the decentralization of the National Archives and the movement for an independent National Archives. Undoubtedly, most current National … Continue reading The Decentralization of Archives Debate and National Archives Independence, 1979-1984

A Brief Survey of the Disposition of Captured Japanese Records, 1945-1962

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Within five years after the end of World War II the Japanese Government was making requests for the release of convicted war criminals and for the return of records that had been captured by US military forces. … Continue reading A Brief Survey of the Disposition of Captured Japanese Records, 1945-1962

The Exploitation of Captured Japanese Records

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In January 2002, I met Duval A. Edwards, an Army Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC) veteran of World War II in the Pacific and learned that he had been involved in the capture of Japanese records, beginning in … Continue reading The Exploitation of Captured Japanese Records

A Front Line of Defense: The 758th Radar Squadron and the Makah Air Force Station, Neah Bay, Washington, 1950-1988

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. "Last Pass at Makah" by Michael J. Machat. US Air Force Collection (National Archives ID 6436075). The United States Government has had a long association with Neah Bay, Washington and its inhabitants, mostly members of the Makah … Continue reading A Front Line of Defense: The 758th Radar Squadron and the Makah Air Force Station, Neah Bay, Washington, 1950-1988

Brevet Brigadier General Samuel Chapman Armstrong’s Civil War

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Gen. Samuel C. Armstrong (NAID 167250430). At Benedict, Maryland, in command of U.S. Colored Troops, on December 17, 1863, Union Army Lt. Col. Samuel Chapman Armstrong wrote, “we are ?ghting for humanity and freedom, the South for … Continue reading Brevet Brigadier General Samuel Chapman Armstrong’s Civil War

A Life Well Lived: Amelia Tyler of the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute and the United States Patent Office, 1832-1908

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In June 1908, the Scientific American reported on the death of Amelia Tyler. The periodical noted that she had died on May 23, at her home in Washington, D.C. and that her death “has caused widespread regret … Continue reading A Life Well Lived: Amelia Tyler of the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute and the United States Patent Office, 1832-1908

Assignment: Neah Bay, Washington, 1909; The United States Revenue-Cutter Service and the USRC Snohomish

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Background The discovery of the mineral wealth of Alaska led immediately to a large development of the coastwise trade along the northwestern seaboard of the United States, and particularly in Puget Sound. Navigators were then, as now, … Continue reading Assignment: Neah Bay, Washington, 1909; The United States Revenue-Cutter Service and the USRC Snohomish