Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences III: Great Britain

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. An earlier post - here - described the request for information about French, British, and German experience with Daylight Saving Time made to the Department of State by Marcus Marks, President of the Borough … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences III: Great Britain

Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences II: France

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. An earlier post described the request for information about overseas experience with Daylight Saving Time made to the Department of State by Marcus Marks, President of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City.  … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences II: France

Daylight Saving Time Begins, 1916, Part II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. An earlier posting noted that after many years of consideration around the World, Imperial Germany and Austria-Hungary became the first countries to institute Daylight Saving Time.  Great Britain and France soon followed suit. The … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time Begins, 1916, Part II

Daylight Saving Time Begins, 1916

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. After many years of consideration around the World, Imperial Germany became the first country to institute Daylight Saving Time. On April 6, 1916, the Federal Council (Bundesrat) passed an order directing a change in … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time Begins, 1916

Atomic activity in Iran. How things change.

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In March 1948, the Department of State sent a request for information about host country atomic energy developments to its diplomatic offices overseas.  The Department directed posts to forward copies of basic laws, statutes, … Continue reading Atomic activity in Iran. How things change.

The Department of State Reacts to Public Revelations of Intelligence Activities, 1964

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The book The Invisible Government, published by Random House Publishers in 1964, is one of the first major exposés of the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).  The book was written by the … Continue reading The Department of State Reacts to Public Revelations of Intelligence Activities, 1964

Vietnam Negotiations, 1968: The Problem of Leaks

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The fall of 1968 leading up to the Presidential election on November 5, saw active peace negotiations between the United States and North Vietnam.[1] One (among many) aspect of the situation that threatened to … Continue reading Vietnam Negotiations, 1968: The Problem of Leaks

Celebrating Victory in Europe (VE) Day, 1945

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. As World War II in Europe drew to a victorious close in late April 1945, the Department of State sent the following circular telegram to American diplomatic and consular officers.[1]  In it, the Department … Continue reading Celebrating Victory in Europe (VE) Day, 1945

Aftermath of War: A World War I Hero Lost at Sea: The Death of Charles Whittlesey, 1921

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. One of the more notable incidents in the combat experience of U.S. troops during World War I is that of the so-called "Lost Battalion." During the fighting in the Meuse-Argonne in October 1918, over … Continue reading Aftermath of War: A World War I Hero Lost at Sea: The Death of Charles Whittlesey, 1921

Image of US Military personnel stack coffins containing the remains of the victims of the Jonestown Tragedy for transport to Dover Air Force Base, Delaware (NAID 6413436)

Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

Today’s post is written by Victoria Otero, an Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. November 18, 2018 marked 40 years since the passing of 918 people in the jungles of Guyana. While debate still exists as to whether or not the event was one of mass suicide or mass murder, the event … Continue reading Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later