“Amazingly Poor Judgement”: Robert Sam Anson in Cambodia, August 1970

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives in College Park, MD Noted journalist Robert Sam Anson died on November 2, 2020.  The obituaries printed in The New York Times and The Washington Post mentioned that he was captured and held by Communist forces in Cambodia while covering … Continue reading “Amazingly Poor Judgement”: Robert Sam Anson in Cambodia, August 1970

Khrushchev’s Secret Speech, 1956

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Josef Stalin presided over the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.) from 1928 until he died in March 1953. (See this post for a humorous reaction to his death.) His standing in the U.S.S.R. at the … Continue reading Khrushchev’s Secret Speech, 1956

The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part II – William Slater Brown

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. The previous post described the French internment of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown during World War I because of the latter's comments in letters home.  It ended with the release of Cummings and his return to … Continue reading The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part II – William Slater Brown

The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part I – E.E. Cummings

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. E.E. Cummings (Edward Estlin Cummings) is widely regarded as one of America's greatest poets.  A 1915 graduate of Harvard University, during World War I he volunteered for the ambulance service operated by the American Red Cross in … Continue reading The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part I – E.E. Cummings

Foreign Reaction to Reforming the Supreme Court, 1937

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. Franklin D. Roosevelt began his second term in office on January 20, 1937, the first President inaugurated on that day and month.  In February, reflecting his frustration with the Supreme Court's numerous negative decisions on New Deal … Continue reading Foreign Reaction to Reforming the Supreme Court, 1937

The Resurrection of World War II Lend-Lease Records on the USSR: A Story in Seven Parts

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Among the records of the Foreign Economic Administration (RG 169) in the National Archives are microfilms of the files of the USSR Branch of that agency.  The records constitute the primary policy and subject files … Continue reading The Resurrection of World War II Lend-Lease Records on the USSR: A Story in Seven Parts

An American Car on the Road in the USSR, 1972

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The tight restrictions on travelers in the USSR closed more than 97% of that country to most foreigners.  The travel restrictions particularly affected diplomats from the Western Powers.  Nevertheless, from time to time, staff of … Continue reading An American Car on the Road in the USSR, 1972

Tony Curtis on Creating Good Will for America: 1956

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In 1956, Tony Curtis was an up-and-coming actor.  In a career stretching from the 1940s to the 2000s, he starred in both dramatic and comedic films.  By 1956, he had had some success in such … Continue reading Tony Curtis on Creating Good Will for America: 1956

Recognizing Women in Foreign Affairs, 1957

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In 1957, the U.S. Foreign Service had relatively few women members and up to that date only seven women had ever held the position of Minister or Ambassador (head of a diplomatic post).  The … Continue reading Recognizing Women in Foreign Affairs, 1957

Reading the Riot Act: American Reaction to Leaks in the Foreign Press

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The leak of sensitive information to the American press is a perpetual problem for U.S. Government officials.  See here, here, and here for earlier posts on that subject.  The U.S. government, however, is not … Continue reading Reading the Riot Act: American Reaction to Leaks in the Foreign Press