Foul Shot: William Sharman v. C. Schmidt & Sons

Today's post was written by Matthew DiBiase, archives specialist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. A new exhibit showcasing the impact sports have had on America has opened at the National Archives Museum. All American: The Power of Sports spans centuries of United States history and features more than 75 original items from National Archives’ holdings. The … Continue reading Foul Shot: William Sharman v. C. Schmidt & Sons

Face Off: Derek Sanderson vs. the NHL

Today's post was written by Matthew DiBiase, archives specialist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. A new exhibit showcasing the impact sports have had on America has opened at the National Archives Museum. All American: The Power of Sports spans centuries of United States history and features more than 75 original items from National Archives’ … Continue reading Face Off: Derek Sanderson vs. the NHL

Cropped image of doodles of faces in the margins of a naturalization record.

Morose Marginalia on Naturalization Records

Today's post was written by Andrew Salyer, archives technician at the National Archives at Philadelphia. National Archives staff reference staff respond to thousands of requests for records every year, and many of those requests are for naturalization records. These records are pretty standard, oftentimes looking very similar to one another…but not always. During the course … Continue reading Morose Marginalia on Naturalization Records

Sports in Courts: Savagery on Sunday

Today's post was written by Matthew DiBiase, archives specialist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. A new exhibit showcasing the impact sports have had on America has opened at the National Archives Museum. All American: The Power of Sports spans centuries of United States history and features more than 75 original items from National Archives’ … Continue reading Sports in Courts: Savagery on Sunday

An Indigenous Woman’s Legal Fight After Forced Sterilization

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Special thanks to Rose Buchanan and Cody White, Subject Matter Experts for Native American Related Records, for their feedback and expertise during the process of writing this post. The following piece along with associated archival records discuss forced sterilization, racist slurs … Continue reading An Indigenous Woman’s Legal Fight After Forced Sterilization

Equalization and its Role in Dismantling Racial Segregation in Virginia Public Schools

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. A companion lesson plan can be viewed here on DocsTeach. The fight to desegregate schools started long before the Supreme Court’s decision in Oliver Brown, et al. v. Board of Education of Topeka, et al., and it continues today. As can … Continue reading Equalization and its Role in Dismantling Racial Segregation in Virginia Public Schools

top of Bill of complaint

The Past is the Present in the Asian American/Pacific Islander Records Aggregation Project

Today’s post is by Leah Booth and John Marden, Archives Technicians at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. As part of the Asian American/Pacific Islander Records Aggregation Project at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) we are working to assess our holdings of records and materials relevant to the Asian American and Pacific … Continue reading The Past is the Present in the Asian American/Pacific Islander Records Aggregation Project

The United States vs the Ship Bat: A Civil War Prize Case

Today’s post is by Joseph P. Keefe, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Boston. When the American Civil War broke out on April 12, 1861, the newly formed Confederate States of America had no ships to speak of in its navy. In the months leading up to the war, the Confederate government sought the … Continue reading The United States vs the Ship Bat: A Civil War Prize Case

Run for the border: Beer Bootlegging during the Prohibition

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. “Dear Sir. This Company is not making any ‘near-beer of any kind at present and not until Mont. goes dry yours very truly Lewistown Brewing Co.” So wrote Gus Hodel and his Lewistown Brewing Company of Montana in April 1918, a … Continue reading Run for the border: Beer Bootlegging during the Prohibition