All Aboard! Train Stations in the Records of the National Register of Historic Places

Franklin D. Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt at a Train Station(National Archives Identifier 196066722) Traveling by train is regarded by many as a great way to travel. There are several hundred train stations listed on the National Register of Historic Places (National Archives Identifier 20812721). The gentleman and his wife, pictured above, traveled frequently by train, … Continue reading All Aboard! Train Stations in the Records of the National Register of Historic Places

Documenting the Deceased: Typhoid Fever During the Spanish-American War

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. While the Spanish-American War lasted four months (April 21 – August 13, 1898), it resulted in almost 2,500 deaths of American soldiers.[1] The short-lived conflict officially came to a close with the Treaty of Paris, which was signed on December 10, … Continue reading Documenting the Deceased: Typhoid Fever During the Spanish-American War

Denver, Colorado Statistically According to the 1950 Census of Housing

Today’s post was written by Claire Wehking, Archives Technician at the National Archives at Denver, Colorado. Aerial Photography Index for Denver County, Colorado, Sheet 1 (National Archives Identifier 88691227) Preliminary results of the 1950 Census of Housing were published in a series of reports, HC-1, HC-2, HC-3, HC-4, and HC-5 and were based on preliminary … Continue reading Denver, Colorado Statistically According to the 1950 Census of Housing

Denver, Colorado Statistically According to the 1950 Census of Population

Today’s post was written by Claire Wehking, Archives Technician at the National Archives at Denver. 134 Keypunch Operator, 1950 (National Archives Identifier 76643208) Preliminary results of the 1950 Census of Population were published in a series of reports and were based on preliminary counts, much like the Census of Housing. The preliminary counts of the … Continue reading Denver, Colorado Statistically According to the 1950 Census of Population

soldier in uniform w/sunglasses looks down on camera smiling, ticker tape and skyscrapers stretch above him

Don’t Rain on My Parade

New York City has seen many ticker-tape parades.  Presidents.  Prime Ministers.  Kings.  Queens.  Astronauts.  Sports figures and teams.  Politicians.  Even one musician.  All have ridden through the high rise canyon of the Big Apple as the ticker-tape and shredded paper floated down and people cheered. U.S. Army Private First Class White waves an American flag … Continue reading Don’t Rain on My Parade

Notated layout plan for Heart Mountain Relocation Camp. Atlas on bottom right corner acts as key to map.

Japanese American Internment and Resistance at Heart Mountain

Today’s post is written by Lucas Blackwood, an intern at the National Archives at Denver. When World War II began the United States chose to remain neutral and did not join the war right away. Then, on December 7, 1941, Japan, part of the axis powers and allied with Germany, attacked the U.S. military base … Continue reading Japanese American Internment and Resistance at Heart Mountain

Cemeteries in the Records of the National Register of Historic Places

Why are there fences around cemeteries? Because people are dying to get in. Bad dad joke Shell Road in Mortaire Cemetery (National Archives Identifier 169153267) There are more than ninety-four thousand properties in the National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017 (National Archives Identifier 20812721), of which there … Continue reading Cemeteries in the Records of the National Register of Historic Places

“An Act of Displeasure:” Reaction to the Possibility of a Woman Ambassador, 1951

In April 1950, the United States and Ireland elevated the diplomatic presence in their respective national capitals from a legation (headed by an Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary) to an embassy (headed by an Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary).  The last American minister and first American ambassador to Ireland was George A. Garrett, whose tenure covered … Continue reading “An Act of Displeasure:” Reaction to the Possibility of a Woman Ambassador, 1951

BENEATH HIS SHIRT SLEEVES: Evidence of Injury, Part II

Tintype Images of Wounded Civil War Union Soldiers from Pension Application Files in the U.S. National Archives This is the second of two posts about personal tintype images of wounded soldiers in the Civil War Pension Application Files from the Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs (Record Group 15).  **Please note that the following … Continue reading BENEATH HIS SHIRT SLEEVES: Evidence of Injury, Part II

photo of man w/short hair and mustache, bare torso, right side turned toward camera to show amputated right arm at the shoulder, w/exposed bone

BENEATH HIS SHIRT SLEEVES: Evidence of Injury

Tintype Images of Wounded Civil War Union Soldiers from Pension Application Files in the U.S. National Archives **Please note that the following post contains graphic images that may be disturbing to some readers.** This is the first of two posts about personal tintype images of wounded soldiers in the Civil War Pension Application Files from … Continue reading BENEATH HIS SHIRT SLEEVES: Evidence of Injury