Z Plan cover page

The Capture and Exploitation of Japanese Records during World War II

Today’s post is by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. U.S. Military forces began capturing records almost as soon as the war began and started exploiting them immediately. Documents were first captured from a Japanese plane downed in the Pearl Harbor attack. These provided the first clues to … Continue reading The Capture and Exploitation of Japanese Records during World War II

The Pentagon Papers: The Department of State Reacts

On June 13, 1971, the New York Times began publishing articles based on a “Top Secret” Office of the Secretary of Defense study of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967.  The study had been leaked to that newspaper by Daniel Ellsberg, one of the analysts who worked on the project. The study, entitled … Continue reading The Pentagon Papers: The Department of State Reacts

Department of State Records Now Available Online: Despatches from Special Agents, Notes to Foreign Missions, and Notes from Foreign Consuls, 1789-1906

The National Archives is pleased to announce that more records of the Department of State have been digitized and are now available online through the National Archives Catalog.  This is the third in a series of occasional posts.  The first post described the microfilm digitization project and the first foreign affairs records made available through … Continue reading Department of State Records Now Available Online: Despatches from Special Agents, Notes to Foreign Missions, and Notes from Foreign Consuls, 1789-1906

Nuremburg Laws excerpt

The Nuremberg Laws: From Nuremberg to the National Archives

Today’s post is by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. For the 1935 Nazi Party Congress in Nuremberg, Nazi German’s Chancellor Adolf Hitler called for the convening of the Reichstag in the city on September 15, the concluding Sunday, in order to pass a Reich Flag Law, making … Continue reading The Nuremberg Laws: From Nuremberg to the National Archives

top of Bill of complaint

The Past is the Present in the Asian American/Pacific Islander Records Aggregation Project

Today’s post is by Leah Booth and John Marden, Archives Technicians at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. As part of the Asian American/Pacific Islander Records Aggregation Project at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) we are working to assess our holdings of records and materials relevant to the Asian American and Pacific … Continue reading The Past is the Present in the Asian American/Pacific Islander Records Aggregation Project

A Founder of the United States Foreign Service Writes: Joseph Grew on the Importance of Diplomatic Service, 1921

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In August 1921, the Department of State sent a circular to all American diplomatic posts asking for answers to a multi-page questionnaire soliciting information to clarify “the needs of the Government in the matter of appropriations … Continue reading A Founder of the United States Foreign Service Writes: Joseph Grew on the Importance of Diplomatic Service, 1921

4 men and 1 woman standing around conference table

More than a “Single Issue Community”: The Congressional Hispanic Conference

Today's post was written by Lynn Nashorn, textual processing and accessioning archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Serving as the Republican counterpart to the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, the Congressional Hispanic Conference (CHC) emerged following a rift within the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus was formed in 1976 as a bipartisan organization … Continue reading More than a “Single Issue Community”: The Congressional Hispanic Conference

Cesar Chavez

Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month with the Records of the National Register of Historic Places

Today’s post is by John LeGloahec, Archives Specialist in the Electronics Records Division at the National Archives in College Park, MD. This post is part of an ongoing “road trip” featuring records from the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017 (National Archives ID 20812721), a series within Record … Continue reading Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month with the Records of the National Register of Historic Places

From the Bronx to the Bench: Sonia Sotomayor’s Trailblazing Journey to the Supreme Court

Today's post was written by Lynn Nashorn, textual processing and accessioning archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Looking South from the Bronx to Manhattan, May 1973 (NAID 548407) Born on June 25, 1954 in The Bronx in New York City, Sonia Sotomayor overcame personal and professional adversity to become the first woman of … Continue reading From the Bronx to the Bench: Sonia Sotomayor’s Trailblazing Journey to the Supreme Court

Shutting Down the Sky: The Federal Aviation Administration on 9/11

By Megan Dwyre, Special Access and FOIA Program Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. September 11, 2001, began as an ordinary day in the United States’ air traffic control system. A Federal Aviation Executive Summary (NAID 7601772) describes the day as “severe clear,” a perfect day for flying. Pilots exchanged “good days'' … Continue reading Shutting Down the Sky: The Federal Aviation Administration on 9/11