The Importance of Australia, 1941

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Australia is, today, a vital ally of the United States.  As the Department of State's February 2017 factsheet on relations with Australia notes, the relationship is "underpinned by shared democratic values, common interests, and … Continue reading The Importance of Australia, 1941

Image of Stedman Elementary School with the caption "An example of later evidence submitted to the court; 1973 site surveys of Denver schools. Stedman, still open today, is located in North Park Hill."

Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado: Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver.  The stark, black and white Denver Post photograph one finds online is startling; in it two firemen are sweeping broken glass from a window shattered by a pipe bomb while Wilfred Keyes and his wife, just shadows in the dark of … Continue reading Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado: Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

Some assessors adorned their otherwise drab government forms.

Tax Assessment Lists of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Today’s post is written by Elise Fariello, Archives Technician at the National Archives at Chicago  A passionate distaste for taxes is built into the very foundation of the United States. Taxation without consent was one of the grievances to King George III outlined in the Declaration of Independence and played no small part in the … Continue reading Tax Assessment Lists of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

British Opinion About The United States After Pearl Harbor

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. World War II began on September 1, 1939, with the German invasion of Poland.  France and Great Britain, fulfilling their international obligations, declared war on Germany but could do little to aid the Poles … Continue reading British Opinion About The United States After Pearl Harbor

War of Words: Race-Based Propaganda During World War II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. World War II was not only a war of battleships and bullets.  Words, in the form of overt and covert propaganda and psychological warfare, played an important role.  See the post Airplanes over France for examples … Continue reading War of Words: Race-Based Propaganda During World War II

Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. During World War II, the U.S. government produced propaganda films to rally public support.  Among the most famous of those motion pictures is Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress released in 1944.  The … Continue reading Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress

An image of Harvey Milk and Jimmy Carter shaking hands.

Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

Today’s post is written by Daria Labinsky, an Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum June 25 marks the fortieth anniversary of gay rights activist and San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk’s Gay Freedom Day speech, sometimes called the “Hope” speech, in which he called on President Jimmy Carter to speak out against Proposition 6, … Continue reading Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident III: Follow Up

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Several investigations followed the near-disaster at Three Mile Island.  The most important was the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island established by President Jimmy Carter in April 1979.  The twelve-member panel … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident III: Follow Up

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident II: International Reaction

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The overseas reaction to the Three Mile Island accident was varied.  In most countries the response was muted but there were exceptions.  Examples of the different reactions include (All referenced telegrams can be viewed … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident II: International Reaction

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident I: Keeping the World Informed

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On March 28, 1979, a nuclear reactor at Three Mile Island outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, experienced a partial meltdown.  While ultimately there was no large-scale release of radioactive materials, the potential for a major disaster … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident I: Keeping the World Informed