Dean Rusk Remembers World War II, 1968

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Dean Rusk served as Secretary of State from January 1961 to January 1969, the second longest tenure in that job in U.S. history.  As with many men of his generation, he saw military service … Continue reading Dean Rusk Remembers World War II, 1968

Humor in the Government, c. 1957

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Robert Bowie served in the Department of State as director of the Policy Planning Staff and as the Department of State representative to the National Security Council Planning Board from 1953 to 1957.  In … Continue reading Humor in the Government, c. 1957

George Kennan Says Farewell to the Policy Planning Staff, 1950

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Secretary of State George C. Marshall established the Policy Planning Staff in May 1947.  He created it to be the Department of State's office for long range planning, the first in the Department’s history.  … Continue reading George Kennan Says Farewell to the Policy Planning Staff, 1950

The Great “Adobe Inn” Move of 1962

Today's post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver “It is a pleasure for me to come out here and help plow up this valley in the cause of progress.” So stated President John F. Kennedy on August 18, 1962, as he stood atop a simple wooden stage 10 miles … Continue reading The Great “Adobe Inn” Move of 1962

Automation in the U.S. Government, 1966: A Look from One Agency

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. As we approach the third decade of the 21st Century, almost all U.S. Government processes and recordkeeping are handled electronically.  Automation began during World War II, expanded with the advent of computers after the … Continue reading Automation in the U.S. Government, 1966: A Look from One Agency

The War after the War: the American Indian Fight for the Vote after WWII

Today's post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records “We all know Congress granted the Indian citizenship in 1924, but we still have no privilege to vote, we do not understand what kind of citizenship you would call that.” - Pvt. … Continue reading The War after the War: the American Indian Fight for the Vote after WWII

Presidents and Diplomatic Ceremony

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. An earlier post discussed President Theodore Roosevelt’s reaction to a ceremonial statement prepared by the Department of State for his use in welcoming a special ambassador from China.  In addition to expressing his displeasure … Continue reading Presidents and Diplomatic Ceremony

Towards a History of Mexican Americans in World War I, Part Two: Soldiers of the 360th Infantry Regiment, 90th Division in France, 1918-1919

Today’s post is written by Victoria-María MacDonald and Emma Taylor, who are volunteers at the National Archives. This article is Part 2 of Towards a History of Mexican Americans in World War I. It evolved out of a volunteer project with the textual records of the American Expeditionary Forces at the National Archives at College … Continue reading Towards a History of Mexican Americans in World War I, Part Two: Soldiers of the 360th Infantry Regiment, 90th Division in France, 1918-1919

Propaganda, Politics, and the Personification of FDR: The Uncle Sam Poster Controversy

This is the third and final post in a three-part series on the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In October 1943, Representative Harold Knutson (R-MN) charged the U.S. … Continue reading Propaganda, Politics, and the Personification of FDR: The Uncle Sam Poster Controversy

The Uncle Sam “Hush” Poster and the One That Never Was

This is the second of three posts about the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Uncle Sam by Leon Helguera (left). Uncle Sam by Robert S. Sloan (right). Today, … Continue reading The Uncle Sam “Hush” Poster and the One That Never Was