The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part II – William Slater Brown

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. The previous post described the French internment of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown during World War I because of the latter's comments in letters home.  It ended with the release of Cummings and his return to … Continue reading The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part II – William Slater Brown

The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part I – E.E. Cummings

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. E.E. Cummings (Edward Estlin Cummings) is widely regarded as one of America's greatest poets.  A 1915 graduate of Harvard University, during World War I he volunteered for the ambulance service operated by the American Red Cross in … Continue reading The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part I – E.E. Cummings

U.S. Army Quartermaster Officers in the Philippines, 1900-1901

Today’s post is by Claire Kluskens, Genealogy/Census Subject Matter Expert and Digital Projects Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Quartermaster officers are responsible for ensuring that the army has the equipment, materials, and supplies needed to support soldiers wherever they are located. The Spanish-American War (1898), China Relief Expedition (1898-1901), and Philippine Insurrection … Continue reading U.S. Army Quartermaster Officers in the Philippines, 1900-1901

From Soldier to Citizen: How to use the Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

Today's post comes from Grace Schultz, an archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Did your immigrant ancestor naturalize after serving in World War I? If so, you may find them in the National Archives Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers (Microfilm Publication M1952) which is available online through all of our digitization … Continue reading From Soldier to Citizen: How to use the Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

Foreign Reaction to Reforming the Supreme Court, 1937

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. Franklin D. Roosevelt began his second term in office on January 20, 1937, the first President inaugurated on that day and month.  In February, reflecting his frustration with the Supreme Court's numerous negative decisions on New Deal … Continue reading Foreign Reaction to Reforming the Supreme Court, 1937

Righting a Wrong: The Return of Blue Lake to the Taos Pueblo

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records “They didn’t get any money for it in the first place, and they don’t want any now. They just want their lake and their land—their sunswept altar and chapel—for their own, without … Continue reading Righting a Wrong: The Return of Blue Lake to the Taos Pueblo

Civil War Veterans Remembered in the Records of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

Today’s post is by Gail E. Farr, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Among other projects, staff at the National Archives at Philadelphia have used recent telework hours to dig in and explore our digitized holdings. The National Archives Catalog allows anyone to tag and transcribe our digitized records, and so some of … Continue reading Civil War Veterans Remembered in the Records of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

Celebrating Native American Heritage Month with the National Register of Historic Places

Today’s post is by John LeGloahec, Archives Specialist in the Electronics Records Division at the National Archives in College Park, MD. This post is part of an ongoing series featuring records from the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017 (National Archives ID 20812721), a series within Record Group … Continue reading Celebrating Native American Heritage Month with the National Register of Historic Places

“Hell Yes, I’ll Vote for Him”: Jimmy Carter’s First Voter

Today’s post is written by Daria Labinsky, an archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library  In this coronavirus-affected election year, let’s look back at a time when presidential candidates made the rounds in person, shook everyone’s hands, gave stump speeches, and kissed babies.  Jimmy Carter with a young fan on the campaign trail, Carter Family … Continue reading “Hell Yes, I’ll Vote for Him”: Jimmy Carter’s First Voter

A Front Line of Defense: The 758th Radar Squadron and the Makah Air Force Station, Neah Bay, Washington, 1950-1988

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. "Last Pass at Makah" by Michael J. Machat. US Air Force Collection (National Archives ID 6436075). The United States Government has had a long association with Neah Bay, Washington and its inhabitants, mostly members of the Makah … Continue reading A Front Line of Defense: The 758th Radar Squadron and the Makah Air Force Station, Neah Bay, Washington, 1950-1988