A Look Ahead at the New Queen, 1953

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Shortly after the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II on June 2, 1953, the U.S. embassy in Great Britain submitted a despatch entitled "The Role of Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh" (now in … Continue reading A Look Ahead at the New Queen, 1953

The Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On February 6, 1952, King George VI of Great Britain died and his daughter, Princess Elizabeth, ascended to the throne.  Formal coronation of the new Queen took place on June 2, 1953.  President Dwight … Continue reading The Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II: Changing Circumstances, Changing Titles

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Upon assuming the crown in February 1952, the British "empire" led by Queen Elizabeth II consisted of a conglomeration of states and territories bound together in various ways.  There were a number of sovereign … Continue reading Queen Elizabeth II: Changing Circumstances, Changing Titles

What Goes Up Must Come Down: Dealing With the International Aspects of the Demise of SKYLAB, Part II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park.  Part I described the SKYLAB program and international concerns about its reentry. Beginning in April 1979, and with increasing frequency as the date approached, the Department of State informed overseas posts of the date … Continue reading What Goes Up Must Come Down: Dealing With the International Aspects of the Demise of SKYLAB, Part II

Tribute to a Fallen Diplomat

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park.  February 14 marks the thirty-ninth anniversary of the murder of U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Adolph "Spike" Dubs in Kabul, Afghanistan.  On February 14, 1979, Ambassador Dubs was kidnapped while being driven through the streets … Continue reading Tribute to a Fallen Diplomat

Passports and Travel Documents for Pilgrims: Gold Star Travel

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On March 2, 1929, President Calvin Coolidge signed PL 70-952.  That law authorized the War Department to arrange for trips, designated as pilgrimages, by the mothers and widows to the overseas graves of soldiers, … Continue reading Passports and Travel Documents for Pilgrims: Gold Star Travel

The Adventures of American Diplomat Walter William Orebaugh in Italy 1942-1944, Part II

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park Part I of this blog was previously posted here.  It was late March when Orebaugh heard he was being actively sought by the Fascists and Germans. They had learned from Captain Bice Pucci, one of the Italian officers … Continue reading The Adventures of American Diplomat Walter William Orebaugh in Italy 1942-1944, Part II

The Adventures of American Diplomat Walter William Orebaugh in Italy 1942-1944, Part I

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park Late in the morning of November 5, 1942, Walter William Orebaugh, American Consul General at Nice, France, received a telephone call from Pinkney Tuck, American Chargé d'affaires at the American Embassy at Vichy, who informed him that the … Continue reading The Adventures of American Diplomat Walter William Orebaugh in Italy 1942-1944, Part I

The Department of State and the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Keeping the Field Informed

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Even though American Foreign Service Officers overseas received the news about the tragic events in Dallas through public media, the Department of State had the responsibility to provide its posts with official updates.  Consequently, … Continue reading The Department of State and the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy: Keeping the Field Informed