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“Fake News” 1942: President Roosevelt and the Chicago Tribune

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park During the first months of 1942, two individuals in the Office of Facts and Figures, within the Office for Emergency Management of the Executive Office of the President, drew up lists of newspapers critical of the Roosevelt Administration.[1] … Continue reading “Fake News” 1942: President Roosevelt and the Chicago Tribune

black and white photo of Sydney Schanberg

Escaping the Killing Fields of Cambodia, 1975

Today’s post was written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Noted journalist Sydney H. Schanberg died on July 9.  While he is perhaps most famous for his reporting from Cambodia during the Khmer Rouge takeover in the mid-1970s, his list of accomplishments and reporting … Continue reading Escaping the Killing Fields of Cambodia, 1975

RICHARD C. HOTTELET, GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE

Noted broadcast journalist Richard C. Hottelet died on December 17, 2014.  He was a great journalist and notable presence on television.  I am old enough to remember reports ending with “Richard C. Hottelet, CBS News.”  The obituaries published in the wake of his death have focused on his journalistic career, and rightfully so.  It is … Continue reading RICHARD C. HOTTELET, GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE

Nicholas Winton and Refugee Children: A Follow-up to “60 Minutes”

Today's post is written by David Langbart, Archivist at the National Archives in College Park. The April 27, 2014, broadcast of the CBS news show “60 Minutes” included a segment entitled “Saving the children.”   It recounted the efforts of Nicholas Winton, a British citizen, to save almost 700 Czechoslovakian children, mostly Jewish, from the Nazi … Continue reading Nicholas Winton and Refugee Children: A Follow-up to “60 Minutes”

Fear and loathing at the National Archives

Today's post is written by College Park archivist Kylene Tucker. As part of my ADP (Archivist Development Program) rotation with the FOIA staff, I reviewed the FBI case file of Hunter S. Thompson from the Denver Field Office. The file covers 1965-1971 when Thompson lived in Colorado briefly, moved to California, and then returned to Woody … Continue reading Fear and loathing at the National Archives

The Octopus

Today’s post is written by Alfie Paul, a processing archivist who works with civilian textual records. On an August day in 1991, the body of free-lance reporter Danny Casolaro was found dead in a Martinsburg, West Virginia motel bathtub by two maids.  Ruled a suicide, Casolaro’s death was just a small piece of a larger … Continue reading The Octopus

Fun in the Sun: Tarawa Atoll in 1944

Today's post is written by Lloyd Beers, a processing archivist who works with U.S. Navy records. Wartime has many faces and all of them are revealed in the records held by the National Archives and Records Administration.  The April 17, 1944 issue of Life magazine featured a more relaxed face with an article picturing U.S. … Continue reading Fun in the Sun: Tarawa Atoll in 1944

I hope my crown doesn’t clash with my dress

Our pals over at Prologue:  Pieces of History have “Facial Hair Friday;”  here at The Text Message, we give you “Beauty Queen Monday.”  The document featured in today's post is from the January – February 1960 issue of The Shield, an employee newsletter published by the International Cooperation Administration (ICA).  You can find issues of  … Continue reading I hope my crown doesn’t clash with my dress

The gangster, the bank robber, the baby face, and a G-Man

Yesterday, I posted about Department of Justice press releases.  Today, I’d like to share a few of my favorites! One early press release, dated November 6, 1933, details the establishment of a federal penitentiary on Alcatraz Island, which according to the release, “is a necessary part of the Government’s campaign against predatory crime.”  Three years … Continue reading The gangster, the bank robber, the baby face, and a G-Man

You Never Know Who You’ll Meet in the Records!

What do John Dillinger, Al Capone, Bruno Hauptmann, and Frank Sinatra’s son have in common? You can find a press release (or in some cases, more than one!) relating to them at the National Archives!  Recently, I processed and described the series “Press Releases, Speeches, Testimonies, and Other Records, 1933-1984” (ARC ID 5605357) in RG … Continue reading You Never Know Who You’ll Meet in the Records!