“I Am Indeed Proud to Have the Opportunity to Present These Memoranda”: The Environmentalist Photographer Meets the Conservation President

By Daria Labinsky, Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum Together, Mr. President, I am certain we can indeed do this one right the first time! - Ansel Adams to Jimmy Carter, November 6, 1979.[1] While legendary photographer Ansel Adams is best known for his dramatic landscapes, he made images in many genres, … Continue reading “I Am Indeed Proud to Have the Opportunity to Present These Memoranda”: The Environmentalist Photographer Meets the Conservation President

We Hold the Rock!

Today’s post is written by Joseph Gillette, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. On March 21, 1963, the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary, often referred to simply as Alcatraz or “the Rock”, closed. High costs, deteriorating physical conditions, and a notorious reputation for brutality all contributed to the decision to close what was generally considered … Continue reading We Hold the Rock!

The Great “Adobe Inn” Move of 1962

Today's post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver “It is a pleasure for me to come out here and help blow up this valley in the cause of progress.” So stated President John F. Kennedy on August 18, 1962, as he stood atop a simple wooden stage 10 miles … Continue reading The Great “Adobe Inn” Move of 1962

“Throw Dummy Off Dam;” Filming at the Hoover Dam

Today's post is written by Cody White, archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Cut to a close-up of the turbines turning. Cut to water pouring over the dam. Cut to the kid spitting out and over the dam. Cut to the kid looking down at the water rushing past.  Voice over; “Coming March 15th, a … Continue reading “Throw Dummy Off Dam;” Filming at the Hoover Dam

The Bureau of Reclamation’s Push to Create the Shoshone Cavern National Monument

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. “The cave was discovered by a man and his dog.” So University of Wyoming Professor Emeritus of History Phil Roberts succinctly explained it in a 2015 Wyoming State Historical Society blog post about Shoshone Cavern, Wyoming’s second named national monument and … Continue reading The Bureau of Reclamation’s Push to Create the Shoshone Cavern National Monument

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident III: Follow Up

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Several investigations followed the near-disaster at Three Mile Island.  The most important was the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island established by President Jimmy Carter in April 1979.  The twelve-member panel … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident III: Follow Up

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident II: International Reaction

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The overseas reaction to the Three Mile Island accident was varied.  In most countries the response was muted but there were exceptions.  Examples of the different reactions include (All referenced telegrams can be viewed … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident II: International Reaction

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident I: Keeping the World Informed

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On March 28, 1979, a nuclear reactor at Three Mile Island outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, experienced a partial meltdown.  While ultimately there was no large-scale release of radioactive materials, the potential for a major disaster … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident I: Keeping the World Informed

A Wasteful Use of Time: EPA Regulations of Hazardous Waste in the 1980’s

Today's post was written by Brian Schamber, student at Central Michigan University and summer intern in Textual Processing at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Since the implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976, municipalities, corporations and landfills across the United States have had to deal with hazardous waste in … Continue reading A Wasteful Use of Time: EPA Regulations of Hazardous Waste in the 1980’s

T.V. Pearson and the Parachute Scheme

Today’s post is written by Richard Elsom, an Archives Technician at the National Archives at Denver. In the West, wildland fire is a regular threat to populated spaces as well as the rugged backcountry found in forests and wilderness areas. In 1939, in an effort to improve response time on fires in remote areas, the … Continue reading T.V. Pearson and the Parachute Scheme