The Bureau of Reclamation’s Push to Create the Shoshone Cavern National Monument

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. “The cave was discovered by a man and his dog.” So University of Wyoming Professor Emeritus of History Phil Roberts succinctly explained it in a 2015 Wyoming State Historical Society blog post about Shoshone Cavern, Wyoming’s second named national monument and … Continue reading The Bureau of Reclamation’s Push to Create the Shoshone Cavern National Monument

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident III: Follow Up

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Several investigations followed the near-disaster at Three Mile Island.  The most important was the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island established by President Jimmy Carter in April 1979.  The twelve-member panel … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident III: Follow Up

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident II: International Reaction

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The overseas reaction to the Three Mile Island accident was varied.  In most countries the response was muted but there were exceptions.  Examples of the different reactions include (All referenced telegrams can be viewed … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident II: International Reaction

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident I: Keeping the World Informed

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On March 28, 1979, a nuclear reactor at Three Mile Island outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, experienced a partial meltdown.  While ultimately there was no large-scale release of radioactive materials, the potential for a major disaster … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident I: Keeping the World Informed

A Wasteful Use of Time: EPA Regulations of Hazardous Waste in the 1980’s

Today's post was written by Brian Schamber, student at Central Michigan University and summer intern in Textual Processing at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Since the implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976, municipalities, corporations and landfills across the United States have had to deal with hazardous waste in … Continue reading A Wasteful Use of Time: EPA Regulations of Hazardous Waste in the 1980’s

T.V. Pearson and the Parachute Scheme

Today’s post is written by Richard Elsom, an Archives Technician at the National Archives at Denver. In the West, wildland fire is a regular threat to populated spaces as well as the rugged backcountry found in forests and wilderness areas. In 1939, in an effort to improve response time on fires in remote areas, the … Continue reading T.V. Pearson and the Parachute Scheme

Concrete and Canyons: Senator Robert Kennedy’s 1967 Family Vacation

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Nearly 50 years ago on June 29, 1967 an airplane landed at Hall’s Crossing near the upper end of Utah’s Lake Powell. On hand to meet the plane was San Juan County Commissioner Calvin Black who presented two Navajo blankets to … Continue reading Concrete and Canyons: Senator Robert Kennedy’s 1967 Family Vacation

The CCC . . . in Color!

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. In his first 100 days in office, President Franklin Roosevelt worked furiously to tamp down the widespread unemployment and economic unrest that gripped the United States back in 1932. Arguably the most famous legislation passed that spring was the Emergency Conservation … Continue reading The CCC . . . in Color!

The Unforgettable Calamity – 40th Anniversary of the Teton Dam Failure

Today's post was written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver “As I sit here and watch I can see it caving in. It is just coming apart, completely coming apart… my advice to people downstream that are living along the Teton River, get your belongings, get your belongings. Don’t push your … Continue reading The Unforgettable Calamity – 40th Anniversary of the Teton Dam Failure

Fur Warden Sketches Map of Fortymile River Basin in Alaska

Today's post was written by Laurie Moyer, who volunteers on education and archival projects at the National Archives at College Park. Throughout December of 1917, the thermometer in Chicken, Alaska, a village about 40 miles west of the Canadian border, repeatedly plunged to 56 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. All activities were “practically at a standstill,” … Continue reading Fur Warden Sketches Map of Fortymile River Basin in Alaska