Image of Stedman Elementary School with the caption "An example of later evidence submitted to the court; 1973 site surveys of Denver schools. Stedman, still open today, is located in North Park Hill."

Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado: Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver.  The stark, black and white Denver Post photograph one finds online is startling; in it two firemen are sweeping broken glass from a window shattered by a pipe bomb while Wilfred Keyes and his wife, just shadows in the dark of … Continue reading Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado: Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

Some assessors adorned their otherwise drab government forms.

Tax Assessment Lists of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Today’s post is written by Elise Fariello, Archives Technician at the National Archives at Chicago  A passionate distaste for taxes is built into the very foundation of the United States. Taxation without consent was one of the grievances to King George III outlined in the Declaration of Independence and played no small part in the … Continue reading Tax Assessment Lists of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

What Goes Up Must Come Down: Dealing With the International Aspects of the Demise of SKYLAB, Part I

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park.  The reentry of space debris carries the potential to cause a major international incident. While most such remains burn up in the atmosphere, larger pieces can survive and cause damage, injury, or even death … Continue reading What Goes Up Must Come Down: Dealing With the International Aspects of the Demise of SKYLAB, Part I

Berlin Reacts to the Assassination of John F. Kennedy

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. After President John F. Kennedy's triumphant June 1963 visit to West Berlin to show support for that city and his famous proclamation "Ich bin ein Berliner," it should not be surprising that citizens of … Continue reading Berlin Reacts to the Assassination of John F. Kennedy

Captain Randolph B. Marcy’s Expedition from Camp Scott, Utah Territory to the New Mexico Territory and Return, November 1857-June 1858, Part 2 of 2.

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park Captain Marcy, from Camp on Fontaine qui Bouille, on April 6, wrote a family member, that for the past several days they had been traveling towards Utah, without anything of interest occurring to please or annoy them: The … Continue reading Captain Randolph B. Marcy’s Expedition from Camp Scott, Utah Territory to the New Mexico Territory and Return, November 1857-June 1858, Part 2 of 2.

Captain Randolph B. Marcy’s Expedition from Camp Scott, Utah Territory to the New Mexico Territory and Return, November 1857 – June 1858, Part 1 of 2.

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park On November 24, 1857, Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston, commanding the Army of Utah, then located at Camp Scott, a mile from Fort Bridger, then part of the Utah Territory, ordered Captain Randolph B. Marcy, 5th Regiment of Infantry, … Continue reading Captain Randolph B. Marcy’s Expedition from Camp Scott, Utah Territory to the New Mexico Territory and Return, November 1857 – June 1858, Part 1 of 2.

U.S. Domestic Discrimination as a Problem in the United Nations, 1949

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The effect of race discrimination on U.S. international relations during the years after World War II was a critical issue for U.S. foreign policy and remains so to this day. After World War II, … Continue reading U.S. Domestic Discrimination as a Problem in the United Nations, 1949

A Most Remarkable Accomplishment: Changing the Name of a NATO Working Group

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. In late 1962, Lt. Col. John TeSelle, U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps, then assigned to the United States Mission to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), made a suggestion that the name of a NATO Working Group, … Continue reading A Most Remarkable Accomplishment: Changing the Name of a NATO Working Group

Establishing and Disbanding the Neah Bay Settlement, 1792

Part III of the blog series 225 Years Ago: Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Spanish Settlement in Washington State, Núñez Gaona (Neah Bay), 1792 Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Spanish naval Lieutenant Salvador Fidalgo, in the Princesa, left San Blas … Continue reading Establishing and Disbanding the Neah Bay Settlement, 1792

Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Nootka Sound Settlement, 1790-1791

Part II of the blog series 225 Years Ago: Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Spanish Settlement in Washington State, Núñez Gaona (Neah Bay), 1792 Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Because of Spain’s growing concerns about its sovereignty over the Pacific … Continue reading Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Nootka Sound Settlement, 1790-1791