Captain Randolph B. Marcy’s Expedition from Camp Scott, Utah Territory to the New Mexico Territory and Return, November 1857-June 1858, Part 2 of 2.

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park Captain Marcy, from Camp on Fontaine qui Bouille, on April 6, wrote a family member, that for the past several days they had been traveling towards Utah, without anything of interest occurring to please or annoy them: The … Continue reading Captain Randolph B. Marcy’s Expedition from Camp Scott, Utah Territory to the New Mexico Territory and Return, November 1857-June 1858, Part 2 of 2.

Captain Randolph B. Marcy’s Expedition from Camp Scott, Utah Territory to the New Mexico Territory and Return, November 1857 – June 1858, Part 1 of 2.

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park On November 24, 1857, Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston, commanding the Army of Utah, then located at Camp Scott, a mile from Fort Bridger, then part of the Utah Territory, ordered Captain Randolph B. Marcy, 5th Regiment of Infantry, … Continue reading Captain Randolph B. Marcy’s Expedition from Camp Scott, Utah Territory to the New Mexico Territory and Return, November 1857 – June 1858, Part 1 of 2.

1953 anti-desegration letter

A Record of Protest

Today’s post is written by M Marie Maxwell, an archives specialist who works at Archives I.   Recently, as a citizen, I attended a local community meeting regarding a contentious proposal, hosted by a city government department. Besides the subject being contentious, attendees against the proposal and the city representatives did not agree on how to voice … Continue reading A Record of Protest

Front cover of Henderson, later named Pike, Petrified Forest

A Tale of Two Tourist Traps: the Creation of Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument in Colorado

Today's post was written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver “We can’t get too much science so am for the park.” And so opened a 1962 letter to the National Park Service from Orson Rice, an Ohio resident who owned a parcel of land near the proposed Florissant Fossil Beds National … Continue reading A Tale of Two Tourist Traps: the Creation of Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument in Colorado

I Can’t Believe It’s Not Oleomargarine

Today’s post was written by Jessica Lee.  She was a summer intern in the Archives 1 Reference Section, working with the Civil records team. During my internship, I have had the opportunity to work with archivists on different kinds of projects. For one assignment, I entered titles of various public and private laws and resolutions … Continue reading I Can’t Believe It’s Not Oleomargarine

letter written on Golden Brewery stationary showing Castle Rock

Lithograph Company v. Adolph Coors – a Case of an Unpaid Tab

Today's post was written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver 142 years ago this fall Adolf Coors, along with Denver businessman Jacob Shueler, recorded a deed of purchase for an abandoned tannery in Golden, Colorado. Within months the building would become home to the Golden Brewery, thus beginning a new chapter … Continue reading Lithograph Company v. Adolph Coors – a Case of an Unpaid Tab

The Best Prophet of the Future is the Past, Part II: Cockpit Doors

This post was written by Chris Naylor, Director of the Textual Records Division. The devastating Germanwings plane crash on March 24, 2015 has reinvigorated the dialogue surrounding airplane cockpit doors, an issue of paramount concern both in 1970 as well as in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. I recently wrote a blog post about … Continue reading The Best Prophet of the Future is the Past, Part II: Cockpit Doors

Baby, It’s Cold Inside!

Today's post is written by Daniel Dancis, an archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD. As most of the eastern seaboard is experiencing record setting low temperatures this week, it is timely to look back at a letter written by then-Senator Joseph R. Biden, Jr. to the Office of the Sergeant At Arms … Continue reading Baby, It’s Cold Inside!

“Fool Thing to Do;” The True Story of Surviving a Fall Into The Carlsbad Caverns National Park Elevator Shaft

Today’s post is written by Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver.  In February 1939, the Superintendent of Carlsbad Caverns National Park Thomas Boles wrote to Robert Ripley’s “Believe It or Not” and Floyd Gibbons’ “Headline Hunter” radio program about what he considered to be an unbelievable story; a ranger had fallen into … Continue reading “Fool Thing to Do;” The True Story of Surviving a Fall Into The Carlsbad Caverns National Park Elevator Shaft

Statistics: The Subtle Tool

Today’s post is written by Meghan Ryan Guthorn, an accessioning archivist at Archives II in College Park In archives, as in books, it is important not to judge the content by the cover. Even the records series with the driest names can be home to some of the most fascinating pieces of history. The President’s … Continue reading Statistics: The Subtle Tool