Elbridge Gerry and the Constitution, 1787-1788

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. It had been a long, hot summer for Elbridge Gerry, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and his colleagues in 1787 at Philadelphia’s Independence Hall. They had come to Philadelphia in May to improve upon the Articles … Continue reading Elbridge Gerry and the Constitution, 1787-1788

Are you down with the PCC? (every name, every place, every subject)

In 1971, the National Archives established the Center for the Documentary Study of the American Revolution through its American Revolution Bicentennial Administration (Records of the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration: RG 452), at Archives I in Washington, DC.  As one of the major Bicentennial projects, the center was a sort of “one stop” location for the … Continue reading Are you down with the PCC? (every name, every place, every subject)

Elbridge Gerry and the Constitutional Convention, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher. This September 17th is the 225th birthday of the Constitution.  Undoubtedly thousands of people will visit the Rotunda of the National Archives to see the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights, as well as the Articles of Confederation.  If they look up at the murals … Continue reading Elbridge Gerry and the Constitutional Convention, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights

Determining the Deposition in 1775

This week in 1775, the battles of Lexington and Concord were fought in Massachusetts.  The Massachusetts militia and Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith’s group of British troops suffered casualties, but it is still unclear which side fired the first shot that began the American Revolution. RG 360, The Papers of the Continental Congress, compiled 1774 – … Continue reading Determining the Deposition in 1775

Publius says “Trick or Treat!”

Today's post is written by Monique Politowski, and is part of her ongoing series on the Federalists. It must have been weird for the readers of the New York Independent Journal to see an essay supposedly written by a long since dead Roman.  Hamilton, Jay, and Madison all used the pseudonym “Publius,” intentionally becoming the … Continue reading Publius says “Trick or Treat!”