From the Bronx to the Bench: Sonia Sotomayor’s Trailblazing Journey to the Supreme Court

Today's post was written by Lynn Nashorn, textual processing and accessioning archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Looking South from the Bronx to Manhattan, May 1973 (NAID 548407) Born on June 25, 1954 in The Bronx in New York City, Sonia Sotomayor overcame personal and professional adversity to become the first woman of … Continue reading From the Bronx to the Bench: Sonia Sotomayor’s Trailblazing Journey to the Supreme Court

Foreign Reaction to Reforming the Supreme Court, 1937

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. Franklin D. Roosevelt began his second term in office on January 20, 1937, the first President inaugurated on that day and month.  In February, reflecting his frustration with the Supreme Court's numerous negative decisions on New Deal … Continue reading Foreign Reaction to Reforming the Supreme Court, 1937

Publius says “Trick or Treat!”

Today's post is written by Monique Politowski, and is part of her ongoing series on the Federalists. It must have been weird for the readers of the New York Independent Journal to see an essay supposedly written by a long since dead Roman.  Hamilton, Jay, and Madison all used the pseudonym “Publius,” intentionally becoming the … Continue reading Publius says “Trick or Treat!”

The U.S. Marshal Service and The Supreme Court

This post was written by Katie Beaver, a student intern working with civilian records.  It is a follow-up to A few good lawmen.   The American South was a particularly tumultuous area after the Civil War and during the occupation of the U.S. Army. Slaves became freedmen and gained the rights of citizenship per the Constitution. … Continue reading The U.S. Marshal Service and The Supreme Court