Cold War Humor, 1953

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Soviet leader Joseph Stalin died on March 5, 1953, at 9:50PM Moscow time.  First word of his final illness was announced by Soviet authorities a day earlier.  The Soviet bulletin announced that Stalin had … Continue reading Cold War Humor, 1953

Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Fallout?

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park.  Three previous posts discussed the publication of the two volumes of memoirs by Nikita Khrushchev, the second volume appearing in mid-1974. The journalist Strobe Talbott served as editor/translator for both books. It appears that Soviet … Continue reading Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Fallout?

Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Part III

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. As noted in a previous post, Little, Brown and Company issued a second set of memoirs in 1974. The book was called KHRUSHCHEV REMEMBERS: The LAST TESTAMENT.[1] Prior to publication of the book, Time … Continue reading Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Part III

Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Part II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. As noted in the previous post, Little, Brown and Company published the memoir of Nikita Khrushchev, KHRUSHCHEV REMEMBERS, in late December 1970.[1] The question of authenticity of the book was of interest to all … Continue reading Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Part II

Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Part I

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In November 1970, the world was surprised by the announcement of the upcoming publication of the memoirs of Nikita Khrushchev, deposed leader of the Soviet Union. Time, Inc. reported that it had acquired the … Continue reading Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Part I

Cuban Missile Crisis, Revisited

Today's post is written by Michael Rhodes, an archives technician in the Archives' National Declassification Center.    Fifty years after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, we are still piecing together the actions of his administration. From the Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Record Group 330), a report – probably … Continue reading Cuban Missile Crisis, Revisited

Political Sensitivity at the Peak of the Cold War

In February 1963, the United Nations (UN) held the UN Conference on the Application of Science and Technology for the Benefit of the Less Developed Areas (UNCAST) in Geneva, Switzerland. This conference, held at the peak of the Cold War, brought together about 1,600 delegates from 96 countries, including delegations from both the West and … Continue reading Political Sensitivity at the Peak of the Cold War

One Small Step

Today's post is written by Alfie Paul, a processing archivist at Archives II. On July 20, 1969 the world watched as the first human beings landed on the moon.  That day 42 years ago was the culmination of a race to the moon that President John F. Kennedy began in 1961 saying he believed “that … Continue reading One Small Step