Humor in Government: A View of the Sino-Soviet Split, 1964

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives in College Park, MD.  One of the major developments of the Cold War was the evolution of a split between the two major communist powers, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and the People’s Republic of China (PRC).  The … Continue reading Humor in Government: A View of the Sino-Soviet Split, 1964

Dear Dr. von Braun: Eccentrics, Crack Pots, & the Moon, Part II

Today’s post is by Shane Bell, Archivist at the National Archives at Atlanta. This is the second of two posts regarding correspondence found in Dr. Wernher von Braun’s Personal Files, 1968 – 1970 (National Archives ID 2827681), Public Affairs Office, George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space … Continue reading Dear Dr. von Braun: Eccentrics, Crack Pots, & the Moon, Part II

Dear Dr. von Braun: Eccentrics, Crack Pots, & the Moon, Part I

Today’s post is by Shane Bell, Archivist at the National Archives at Atlanta. Leading up to the launch of Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969, NASA personnel, engineers, and contractors were not the only people who recognized the gravity of the occasion and the significance of project Apollo. Many United States citizens also felt they … Continue reading Dear Dr. von Braun: Eccentrics, Crack Pots, & the Moon, Part I

Khrushchev’s Secret Speech, 1956

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Josef Stalin presided over the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.) from 1928 until he died in March 1953. (See this post for a humorous reaction to his death.) His standing in the U.S.S.R. at the … Continue reading Khrushchev’s Secret Speech, 1956

The Resurrection of World War II Lend-Lease Records on the USSR: A Story in Seven Parts

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Among the records of the Foreign Economic Administration (RG 169) in the National Archives are microfilms of the files of the USSR Branch of that agency.  The records constitute the primary policy and subject files … Continue reading The Resurrection of World War II Lend-Lease Records on the USSR: A Story in Seven Parts

An American Car on the Road in the USSR, 1972

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The tight restrictions on travelers in the USSR closed more than 97% of that country to most foreigners.  The travel restrictions particularly affected diplomats from the Western Powers.  Nevertheless, from time to time, staff of … Continue reading An American Car on the Road in the USSR, 1972

Soviet Intelligence in the United States, 1971

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The extent of Soviet espionage in the United States was a perpetual question of the Cold War.  From the time of the Bolshevik Revolution in November 1917, but especially during the Great Depression, many … Continue reading Soviet Intelligence in the United States, 1971

Cold War Humor, 1953

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Soviet leader Joseph Stalin died on March 5, 1953, at 9:50PM Moscow time.  First word of his final illness was announced by Soviet authorities a day earlier.  The Soviet bulletin announced that Stalin had … Continue reading Cold War Humor, 1953

Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Fallout?

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park.  Three previous posts discussed the publication of the two volumes of memoirs by Nikita Khrushchev, the second volume appearing in mid-1974. The journalist Strobe Talbott served as editor/translator for both books. It appears that Soviet … Continue reading Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Fallout?

Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Part III

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. As noted in a previous post, Little, Brown and Company issued a second set of memoirs in 1974. The book was called KHRUSHCHEV REMEMBERS: The LAST TESTAMENT.[1] Prior to publication of the book, Time … Continue reading Nikita Khrushchev’s Memoirs: Part III