U.S. Domestic Discrimination as a Problem in the United Nations, 1949

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The effect of race discrimination on U.S. international relations during the years after World War II was a critical issue for U.S. foreign policy and remains so to this day. After World War II, … Continue reading U.S. Domestic Discrimination as a Problem in the United Nations, 1949

A Flag for the United Nations

Today's post was written by David Langbart, Reference Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. John Kelly, a respected columnist for the Washington Post, recently (June 14, 2016) wrote about Brooks Harding’s “Four Freedoms Flag.”  Harding designed the flag to represent the countries fighting against Axis tyranny during World War II, commonly referred to … Continue reading A Flag for the United Nations

John Dulles Mocks Himself

John Foster Dulles Mocks Himself

In January 15, 1958, Willard S. Irle, a member of the New York Stock Exchange sent President Dwight Eisenhower a letter with ideas about the preservation of world peace.  Irle suggested a “three-pronged program” consisting of the establishment of (1) a universal language, (2) a universal monetary system, and (3) a universal system of weights … Continue reading John Foster Dulles Mocks Himself

Political Sensitivity at the Peak of the Cold War

In February 1963, the United Nations (UN) held the UN Conference on the Application of Science and Technology for the Benefit of the Less Developed Areas (UNCAST) in Geneva, Switzerland. This conference, held at the peak of the Cold War, brought together about 1,600 delegates from 96 countries, including delegations from both the West and … Continue reading Political Sensitivity at the Peak of the Cold War