The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Paris

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, often referred to as the “Spanish flu,” was the greatest pandemic of the 20th Century.  It killed upwards of 50 million people worldwide, striking without regard to country or social … Continue reading The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Paris

Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division, Part II

Today's post was written by Jan Hodges, volunteer at the National Archives at College Park, MD. This is a continuation from Part I. Bleary eyed American soldiers were jolted to full wakefulness by the tremendous noise of the barrage in a fog created by nature and intensified by haze from exploding shells.  Both explosive and … Continue reading Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division, Part II

Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division

Today's post is by Jan Hodges, volunteer at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In April 1918, after World War I had ground along for nearly four years, the 26th Division of the American army was assigned to the front lines under French command.  A large German raid on April 20th penetrated the American … Continue reading Seicheprey, Crucible of the 26th Division

The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Philadelphia

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, often referred to as the “Spanish flu,” was the greatest pandemic of the 20th Century.  It killed upwards of 50 million people worldwide, striking without regard to country or … Continue reading The “Spanish Flu” Pandemic of 1918-1919: A Death in Philadelphia

Towards a History of Mexican Americans in World War I, Part Two: Soldiers of the 360th Infantry Regiment, 90th Division in France, 1918-1919

Today’s post is written by Victoria-María MacDonald and Emma Taylor, who are volunteers at the National Archives. This article is Part 2 of Towards a History of Mexican Americans in World War I. It evolved out of a volunteer project with the textual records of the American Expeditionary Forces at the National Archives at College … Continue reading Towards a History of Mexican Americans in World War I, Part Two: Soldiers of the 360th Infantry Regiment, 90th Division in France, 1918-1919

Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences II: France

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. An earlier post described the request for information about overseas experience with Daylight Saving Time made to the Department of State by Marcus Marks, President of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City.  … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences II: France

Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences I: Germany

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Earlier posts (Part I, and Part II) discussed the first implementation of Daylight Saving Time in 1916 by Germany, Austria-Hungary, Great Britain, and France.  Not surprisingly, there was also interest in the United States.  … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences I: Germany

Women in Uniform: Red Cross Service of Mona Ryan Inman in World War I

Today’s post is written by Laney Stevenson, Archives Technician at the National Archives at College Park. In highlighting the stories of bold and courageous women for Women’s History Month, the life of Mona Ryan Inman is especially noteworthy, given the incredible coincidences in the dates and locations of major World War I events and her … Continue reading Women in Uniform: Red Cross Service of Mona Ryan Inman in World War I

Image of plane and caption.

“Penguins Don’t Fly”: The Senate Military Affairs Committee, Secretary of War Baker, and Aircraft Production, 1918

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. On April 6, 1917, America entered World War I. On June 8, 1917, public announcement was made that a great fleet of 20,000 airplanes was about to be created and would be decisive of the war, months … Continue reading “Penguins Don’t Fly”: The Senate Military Affairs Committee, Secretary of War Baker, and Aircraft Production, 1918

Aftermath of War: A World War I Hero Lost at Sea: The Death of Charles Whittlesey, 1921

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. One of the more notable incidents in the combat experience of U.S. troops during World War I is that of the so-called "Lost Battalion." During the fighting in the Meuse-Argonne in October 1918, over … Continue reading Aftermath of War: A World War I Hero Lost at Sea: The Death of Charles Whittlesey, 1921