Tag Archives: RG 59

Before She Became The Ardelia Hall of the Department of State, Part II: Miss Hall as Consultant with the Department of State

Today’s post was written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD. On October 6, 1945, the day Ardelia Hall was terminated from the Strategic Services Unit, she met with Charles B. Sawyer regarding the … Continue reading

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Before She Became The Ardelia Hall of the Department of State, Part I: Miss Hall and the Office of Strategic Services

Today’s post was written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Anyone studying World War II and postwar issues regarding cultural property knows the name Ardelia Hall, either because they know of her work as … Continue reading

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Researching Foreign Affairs Records, Part IV: The Foreign Affairs Records Web Pages

This is the fourth post in a four-part series about conducting research in the records of agencies specifically responsible for U.S. foreign relations.  It is derived from information on the NARA web pages devoted to that topic. Please visit Part … Continue reading

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Researching Foreign Affairs Records Part III: Research Hints

This is the third post in a four-part series about conducting research in the records of agencies specifically responsible for U.S. foreign relations.  It is derived from information on the NARA web pages devoted to that topic. Please visit Part … Continue reading

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Researching Foreign Affairs Records, Part II: Getting Started

This is the second post in a four-part series about conducting research in the records of agencies specifically responsible for U.S. foreign relations.  It is derived from information on the NARA web pages devoted to that topic.  The recommendations herein … Continue reading

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Researching Foreign Affairs Records, Part I: Introduction

This is the first post in a four part series about conducting research in the records of agencies specifically responsible for U.S. foreign relations. It is derived from information on the NARA web pages devoted to that topic. Please visit … Continue reading

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D + 10 Years: The 1954 Celebration of the World War II Invasion of Normandy

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, Archivist at the National Archives in College Park. This past weekend saw the celebration of the 70th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy during World War II.  The invasion was memorably portrayed in the movie … Continue reading

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Diplomats Expressing Displeasure

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, Archivist at the National Archives in College Park. This blog post is derived from an article published on the web site “American Diplomacy: Foreign Service Despatches and Periodic Reports on U.S. Foreign Policy” An essential … Continue reading

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Keeping the Public Informed

Today’s post is written by David Langbart. Public comment about what is now called the lack of transparency about U.S. foreign policy is not a new phenomenon.  The issue goes back to at least World War II, if not before.  Recognizing … Continue reading

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Why working at the National Archives is so interesting

Today’s post is written by David Langbart. To a large degree, working with the records at the National Archives is a never-ending series of fascinating encounters with the original documentation of U.S. history. The following document, a memorandum of conversation (memcon) … Continue reading

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