North vs. South: Civil War Sites in the National Register of Historic Places

Today’s post is by John LeGloahec, Archives Specialist in the Electronics Records Division at the National Archives in College Park, MD. This post is part of an ongoing “road trip” featuring records from the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017 (National Archives ID 20812721), a series within Record … Continue reading North vs. South: Civil War Sites in the National Register of Historic Places

Confederate Descendants in Brazil, 1908

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park, MD. The following is an example of the odd requests made to the Department of State. After the Civil War ended in 1865, numerous Confederates fled the United States.  They had many reasons to leave – economic … Continue reading Confederate Descendants in Brazil, 1908

Civil War Veterans Remembered in the Records of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

Today’s post is by Gail E. Farr, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Among other projects, staff at the National Archives at Philadelphia have used recent telework hours to dig in and explore our digitized holdings. The National Archives Catalog allows anyone to tag and transcribe our digitized records, and so some of … Continue reading Civil War Veterans Remembered in the Records of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

Brevet Brigadier General Samuel Chapman Armstrong’s Civil War

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Gen. Samuel C. Armstrong (NAID 167250430). At Benedict, Maryland, in command of U.S. Colored Troops, on December 17, 1863, Union Army Lt. Col. Samuel Chapman Armstrong wrote, “we are fighting for humanity and freedom, the South for … Continue reading Brevet Brigadier General Samuel Chapman Armstrong’s Civil War

The United States vs the Ship Bat: A Civil War Prize Case

Today’s post is by Joseph P. Keefe, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Boston. When the American Civil War broke out on April 12, 1861, the newly formed Confederate States of America had no ships to speak of in its navy. In the months leading up to the war, the Confederate government sought the … Continue reading The United States vs the Ship Bat: A Civil War Prize Case

Over 650 Newly Digitized Navy Logbooks in the National Archives Catalog

Today's post was written by Gina Perry, Archives Specialist at the National Archives in Washington, DC It was 70 degrees early in the morning on April 24, 1862, according to that day’s entry in the logbook of the U.S.S. Hartford, as the ship sailed its way up the mouth of the Mississippi River: “From 4 … Continue reading Over 650 Newly Digitized Navy Logbooks in the National Archives Catalog

Photographic Intelligence: The Civil War

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. One of the mainstays of intelligence collection is photography.  Among the variety of images collected are overhead photography, aerial photography, and what can only be called regular photography.  All three types are represented in … Continue reading Photographic Intelligence: The Civil War

Winston Churchill Goes to Gettysburg, 1932

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In addition to being a politician and government official, Winston Churchill was an avid writer.  He wrote for newspapers and magazines, as well as books of biography, history, travel, and autobiography and memoir.  Indeed, … Continue reading Winston Churchill Goes to Gettysburg, 1932

Lew Wallace: After the Civil War

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. An earlier post briefly discussed former Confederate general James Longstreet's post-Civil War career in the Federal government. Among the positions he held was that of minister to Turkey (1880-81). His successor in that position … Continue reading Lew Wallace: After the Civil War

James Longstreet: After the Civil War

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. After the Civil War, former Confederates moved forward with their lives. They returned to their homes, many in tatters, their plantations and farms, now without slaves, and their businesses, now in ruins. Over the … Continue reading James Longstreet: After the Civil War