Image of Stedman Elementary School with the caption "An example of later evidence submitted to the court; 1973 site surveys of Denver schools. Stedman, still open today, is located in North Park Hill."

Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado: Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver.  The stark, black and white Denver Post photograph one finds online is startling; in it two firemen are sweeping broken glass from a window shattered by a pipe bomb while Wilfred Keyes and his wife, just shadows in the dark of … Continue reading Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado: Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

War of Words: Race-Based Propaganda During World War II

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. World War II was not only a war of battleships and bullets.  Words, in the form of overt and covert propaganda and psychological warfare, played an important role.  See the post Airplanes over France for examples … Continue reading War of Words: Race-Based Propaganda During World War II

An image of Harvey Milk and Jimmy Carter shaking hands.

Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

Today’s post is written by Daria Labinsky, an Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum June 25 marks the fortieth anniversary of gay rights activist and San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk’s Gay Freedom Day speech, sometimes called the “Hope” speech, in which he called on President Jimmy Carter to speak out against Proposition 6, … Continue reading Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

U.S. Domestic Discrimination as a Problem in the United Nations, 1949

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The effect of race discrimination on U.S. international relations during the years after World War II was a critical issue for U.S. foreign policy and remains so to this day. After World War II, … Continue reading U.S. Domestic Discrimination as a Problem in the United Nations, 1949

1953 anti-desegration letter

A Record of Protest

Today’s post is written by M Marie Maxwell, an archives specialist who works at Archives I.   Recently, as a citizen, I attended a local community meeting regarding a contentious proposal, hosted by a city government department. Besides the subject being contentious, attendees against the proposal and the city representatives did not agree on how to voice … Continue reading A Record of Protest

Foreign Diplomats and Domestic Discrimination

The late 1950s and early 1960s saw the establishment of numerous newly independent nations in Africa and Asia.  This led to an influx of foreign diplomats from countries not previously represented in Washington.  At that time, the Nation’s Capital was still very much a Southern city and the non-Caucasian diplomats assigned there, and in other … Continue reading Foreign Diplomats and Domestic Discrimination

Foreign Policy Aspects of Integration of the U.S. Armed Forces

By Executive Order 9981 (NAID 300009), dated July 26, 1948, President Harry S Truman ordered the integration of the armed forces of the United States.  Given the stationing of large numbers of American forces overseas after World War II, that move potentially had ramifications for U.S. relations with host countries.  With that in mind, on … Continue reading Foreign Policy Aspects of Integration of the U.S. Armed Forces

Foreign Policy and Domestic Discrimination

As the Department of State noted in a major 1950 publication “There is no longer any real distinction between ‘domestic’ and ‘foreign’ affairs.”  (Our Foreign Policy, Department of State Publication 3972, released September 1950).  In the post-World War II Twentieth Century, perhaps no issue better illustrates that statement than the movement for civil rights in … Continue reading Foreign Policy and Domestic Discrimination

NAACP vs the Washington DC Police Department: A 1957 hearing before the DC Board of Commissioners

Earlier this month millions of Americans voted. Voting is one of the hallmarks of our democracy, and one method to make their elected officials accountable to the people. Government accountability, for the elected and the unelected, is also found through peaceful protest, letters, petitions, journalistic exposes, court actions and other expressions of complaint and praise, … Continue reading NAACP vs the Washington DC Police Department: A 1957 hearing before the DC Board of Commissioners

That Cognac Can Get You Into Very, Very Bad Trouble!

As Black History Month draws to a close, nothing illustrates the great progress of the civil rights movement more than a glimpse at a bleaker era. The work we do every day at the National Archives is for the express purpose of preserving historical context, even the disturbing parts, as exemplified in today’s post, written by … Continue reading That Cognac Can Get You Into Very, Very Bad Trouble!