Image of US Military personnel stack coffins containing the remains of the victims of the Jonestown Tragedy for transport to Dover Air Force Base, Delaware (NAID 6413436)

Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

Today’s post is written by Victoria Otero, an Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. November 18, 2018 marked 40 years since the passing of 918 people in the jungles of Guyana. While debate still exists as to whether or not the event was one of mass suicide or mass murder, the event … Continue reading Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

Making Good History: Preserving Records of the February 1893 Negotiations with Hawaiian Commissioners

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On January 17, 1893, Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani was overthrown in a coup.  The resulting Provisional Government sent five commissioners to Washington to negotiate a treaty of annexation with the United States.  To accomplish that, … Continue reading Making Good History: Preserving Records of the February 1893 Negotiations with Hawaiian Commissioners

A poster depicting two hands saluting with an Uncle Sam hat and a Mexican sombrero.

Americans All by Leon Helguera: Appealing to Hispanics on the Home Front in World War II

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In the holdings of the National Archives and Presidential Libraries there are many pictures that reflect the American experience. The image of Rosie the Riveter in - We Can Do it, or Uncle Sam … Continue reading Americans All by Leon Helguera: Appealing to Hispanics on the Home Front in World War II

Towards a History of Mexican American Participation in World War I, Part I

Today’s post is the first of a two-part series written by Victoria-María MacDonald and Emma Taylor, who are volunteers at the National Archives at College Park. The centennial anniversary of American involvement in World War I permits a closer look at the diverse racial and ethnic groups who participated in the Great War. In this … Continue reading Towards a History of Mexican American Participation in World War I, Part I

An image of Harvey Milk and Jimmy Carter shaking hands.

Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

Today’s post is written by Daria Labinsky, an Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum June 25 marks the fortieth anniversary of gay rights activist and San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk’s Gay Freedom Day speech, sometimes called the “Hope” speech, in which he called on President Jimmy Carter to speak out against Proposition 6, … Continue reading Jimmy Carter and Harvey Milk: On the Campaign Trail and Beyond

The Beginnings of the United States Army’s Japanese Language Training: From the Presidio of San Francisco to Camp Savage, Minnesota 1941-1942

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park The United States Army, realizing the need for Japanese language specialists, in 1908, began a language program in Tokyo, with four officers, including George V. Strong. When they completed their program in 1911, a new group began that … Continue reading The Beginnings of the United States Army’s Japanese Language Training: From the Presidio of San Francisco to Camp Savage, Minnesota 1941-1942

Establishing and Disbanding the Neah Bay Settlement, 1792

Part III of the blog series 225 Years Ago: Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Spanish Settlement in Washington State, Núñez Gaona (Neah Bay), 1792 Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Spanish naval Lieutenant Salvador Fidalgo, in the Princesa, left San Blas … Continue reading Establishing and Disbanding the Neah Bay Settlement, 1792

Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Nootka Sound Settlement, 1790-1791

Part II of the blog series 225 Years Ago: Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Spanish Settlement in Washington State, Núñez Gaona (Neah Bay), 1792 Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Because of Spain’s growing concerns about its sovereignty over the Pacific … Continue reading Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Nootka Sound Settlement, 1790-1791

Spanish and British Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the Nootka Sound Controversy, 1774-1789

Part I of the blog series 225 Years Ago: Spanish Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the First Spanish Settlement in Washington State, Núñez Gaona (Neah Bay), 1792 Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Two hundred and twenty-five years ago, in 1792, Spanish Navy Lieutenant … Continue reading Spanish and British Explorations of the Pacific Northwest and the Nootka Sound Controversy, 1774-1789

“Arias Bernal’s Trip to Washington”: a Mexican Cartoonist Joins the War Effort

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives, College Park. Antonio Arias Bernal, an accomplished Mexican political cartoonist, came to Washington, D.C. in 1942 at the invitation of the U.S. government to create editorial cartoons to promote the Allied war effort. Prior to being invited, … Continue reading “Arias Bernal’s Trip to Washington”: a Mexican Cartoonist Joins the War Effort