“I Trust You Will Be Able to Assist Me”: Genealogy Researchers Contact the Bureau of Indian Affairs

Today's post is by Rose Buchanan, Archivist and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records On July 20, 1964, Ida Ellen Stansbury Robinson of Merced, California, wrote to the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) headquarters in Washington, DC, to request information about her family history. “For a number of years I have been aware … Continue reading “I Trust You Will Be Able to Assist Me”: Genealogy Researchers Contact the Bureau of Indian Affairs

Sau Ung Loo Chan, An Advocate for American Citizenship and Immigrant Rights

Today's post is written by Ruth Chan, archivist and Subject Matter Expert for Asian American and Pacific Islander records Special thanks to Holly Rivet, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at St. Louis; Katie Seitz, Archives Specialist at the National Archives in Washington DC; and Victoria Blue, Public Affairs Specialist, for access to the records … Continue reading Sau Ung Loo Chan, An Advocate for American Citizenship and Immigrant Rights

Getting Out the Vote: Indian Reorganization Act Elections on the Rez

Today’s post is by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records It was the day of the election. Debates had gone back and forth over the past year, voting dates had moved around, a parade of folks had stumped the country drumming up support … Continue reading Getting Out the Vote: Indian Reorganization Act Elections on the Rez

Norman Rockwell and his Dam Painting

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. “That’s a mechanical drawing . . . where’s some human interest?” posed the famous artist as he took in the vista of Arizona’s 710-foot-tall, 1,560-foot-wide Glen Canyon Dam. The Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) staffers accompanying the artist—who at that point in … Continue reading Norman Rockwell and his Dam Painting

Dear Diary; the Official Diaries of Office of Indian Affairs Superintendents, 1907-1917

Superintendent Albert Reagan of the Nett Lake Agency in Northern Minnesota was fed up with Tom Fisher. Fisher, a reservation policeman, was already on thin ice with Reagan when Fisher dropped into the agency office on November 16th and complained that he worked too hard. The superintendent vented to his office diary, listing exactly how … Continue reading Dear Diary; the Official Diaries of Office of Indian Affairs Superintendents, 1907-1917

From the Pension Files: the Story of Stephen Twombley

Today's post was written by Catherine Brandsen, Innovation Hub Coordinator at the National Archives in Washington, DC. In the spring of 1864, a white Private named Stephen Twombley of the 1st Maine Cavalry was taken prisoner by Confederates. While being transported on train cars to Andersonville Prison, Twombley jumped from the train and escaped into … Continue reading From the Pension Files: the Story of Stephen Twombley

man w/sunglasses on, no shirt, sitting at piano

Isaac Hayes Gets a B-, 1976

The singer and actor Isaac Hayes had a distinctive voice.  When he sang or when he spoke, it was unmistakably him.  Hayes was a singer, songwriter, composer, and actor.  He was a major contributor to the “Memphis Sound” of the 1960s and 1970s.  Hayes is perhaps best known for writing and performing the theme song … Continue reading Isaac Hayes Gets a B-, 1976

Leslie Feinberg: The FBI and Gender Pronouns

Today's post is by Dr. Amanda Weimer, Supervisory Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In 2022, the National Archives’ Special Access and FOIA Program completed a review of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) investigative case file 100-HQ-480756 on Leslie Dianne Feinberg (September 1, 1949 – November 15, 2014). Feinberg used the … Continue reading Leslie Feinberg: The FBI and Gender Pronouns

Public Outcry, a Broken Treaty, and the Controversial Construction of the Kinzua Dam

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia.  On September 16, 1966, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) drowned over 10,000 acres of Seneca land in northwestern Pennsylvania and southwestern New York. The 1794 Treaty of Canandaigua, signed by George Washington as well as Native and federal delegates, … Continue reading Public Outcry, a Broken Treaty, and the Controversial Construction of the Kinzua Dam