Vietnam Negotiations, 1968: The Problem of Leaks

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The fall of 1968 leading up to the Presidential election on November 5, saw active peace negotiations between the United States and North Vietnam.[1] One (among many) aspect of the situation that threatened to … Continue reading Vietnam Negotiations, 1968: The Problem of Leaks

Image of plane and caption.

“Penguins Don’t Fly”: The Senate Military Affairs Committee, Secretary of War Baker, and Aircraft Production, 1918

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. On April 6, 1917, America entered World War I. On June 8, 1917, public announcement was made that a great fleet of 20,000 airplanes was about to be created and would be decisive of the war, months … Continue reading “Penguins Don’t Fly”: The Senate Military Affairs Committee, Secretary of War Baker, and Aircraft Production, 1918

Image of tower and other buildings with clouds in the background

Building a Radio Tower atop Mount Washington

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. “Believing that the development of experimental facilities on Mount Washington, New Hampshire, is an undertaking that is difficult of verbal description there are attached, hereto, a brief photographic record.  The pictures submitted only … Continue reading Building a Radio Tower atop Mount Washington

Image of Frank Capra standing at podium.

Frank Capra’s Security Clearance

Today's post is written by Jacob Lusk, Archives Specialist in Textual Reference at the National Archives in College Park, MD.  Though best known for such classic films as Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) and It's a Wonderful Life (1946), director Frank Capra also led a distinguished career with the United States Army. He served as a second lieutenant … Continue reading Frank Capra’s Security Clearance

U.S. and Canada Prepare for War Against … Each Other?

Today’s post is written by Larry Shockley, Archives Specialist in the Office of Innovation. A 1995 comedic film titled Canadian Bacon was directed by Michael Moore, and starred Alan Alda as a U.S. President whose approval ratings were tanking. In order to give his administration the desired boost with his base the president and his advisors … Continue reading U.S. and Canada Prepare for War Against … Each Other?

“Throw Dummy Off Dam;” Filming at the Hoover Dam

Today's post is written by Cody White, archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Cut to a close-up of the turbines turning. Cut to water pouring over the dam. Cut to the kid spitting out and over the dam. Cut to the kid looking down at the water rushing past.  Voice over; “Coming March 15th, a … Continue reading “Throw Dummy Off Dam;” Filming at the Hoover Dam

Photograph of John Werito.

John Werito Goes to War; A Story of a WWII Diné [Navajo] Code Talker

Today's post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records. Invaluable assistance to this blog was also provided by Cara Lebonick of the National Archives at St. Louis. The concept of using tribal languages as a battlefield code was first explored in … Continue reading John Werito Goes to War; A Story of a WWII Diné [Navajo] Code Talker

Celebrating Victory in Europe (VE) Day, 1945

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. As World War II in Europe drew to a victorious close in late April 1945, the Department of State sent the following circular telegram to American diplomatic and consular officers.[1]  In it, the Department … Continue reading Celebrating Victory in Europe (VE) Day, 1945

Aftermath of War: A World War I Hero Lost at Sea: The Death of Charles Whittlesey, 1921

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. One of the more notable incidents in the combat experience of U.S. troops during World War I is that of the so-called "Lost Battalion." During the fighting in the Meuse-Argonne in October 1918, over … Continue reading Aftermath of War: A World War I Hero Lost at Sea: The Death of Charles Whittlesey, 1921

Prologue to Pearl Harbor: The Spy Flight that Wasn’t, Part II

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. On November 27, 1941, Lt. Cmdr. Edwin T. Layton, Fleet Intelligence Officer, United States Pacific Fleet, met with Colonel Edward W. Raley and the Intelligence Section of the Hawaiian Air Force, to discuss the B-24 reconnaissance mission. … Continue reading Prologue to Pearl Harbor: The Spy Flight that Wasn’t, Part II