A Brief Survey of the Disposition of Captured Japanese Records, 1945-1962

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Within five years after the end of World War II the Japanese Government was making requests for the release of convicted war criminals and for the return of records that had been captured by US military forces. … Continue reading A Brief Survey of the Disposition of Captured Japanese Records, 1945-1962

The Exploitation of Captured Japanese Records

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. In January 2002, I met Duval A. Edwards, an Army Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC) veteran of World War II in the Pacific and learned that he had been involved in the capture of Japanese records, beginning in … Continue reading The Exploitation of Captured Japanese Records

Khrushchev’s Secret Speech, 1956

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Josef Stalin presided over the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.) from 1928 until he died in March 1953. (See this post for a humorous reaction to his death.) His standing in the U.S.S.R. at the … Continue reading Khrushchev’s Secret Speech, 1956

Prepare for Collision! The Ramming of the USS Growler and a Japanese Gunboat

Today’s post is by Nathanial Patch, Reference Archivist and Subject Matter Expert for Navy Records at the National Archives in College Park, MD. January 1943, while on her fourth war patrol, the USS Growler (SS 215) from Brisbane, Australia, had been patrolling the sea lanes to Rabaul on the western end of New Ireland, she … Continue reading Prepare for Collision! The Ramming of the USS Growler and a Japanese Gunboat

The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part II – William Slater Brown

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. The previous post described the French internment of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown during World War I because of the latter's comments in letters home.  It ended with the release of Cummings and his return to … Continue reading The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part II – William Slater Brown

The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part I – E.E. Cummings

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. E.E. Cummings (Edward Estlin Cummings) is widely regarded as one of America's greatest poets.  A 1915 graduate of Harvard University, during World War I he volunteered for the ambulance service operated by the American Red Cross in … Continue reading The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part I – E.E. Cummings

U.S. Army Quartermaster Officers in the Philippines, 1900-1901

Today’s post is by Claire Kluskens, Genealogy/Census Subject Matter Expert and Digital Projects Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Quartermaster officers are responsible for ensuring that the army has the equipment, materials, and supplies needed to support soldiers wherever they are located. The Spanish-American War (1898), China Relief Expedition (1898-1901), and Philippine Insurrection … Continue reading U.S. Army Quartermaster Officers in the Philippines, 1900-1901

From Soldier to Citizen: How to use the Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

Today's post comes from Grace Schultz, an archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Did your immigrant ancestor naturalize after serving in World War I? If so, you may find them in the National Archives Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers (Microfilm Publication M1952) which is available online through all of our digitization … Continue reading From Soldier to Citizen: How to use the Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

Foreign Reaction to Reforming the Supreme Court, 1937

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. Franklin D. Roosevelt began his second term in office on January 20, 1937, the first President inaugurated on that day and month.  In February, reflecting his frustration with the Supreme Court's numerous negative decisions on New Deal … Continue reading Foreign Reaction to Reforming the Supreme Court, 1937

Righting a Wrong: The Return of Blue Lake to the Taos Pueblo

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records “They didn’t get any money for it in the first place, and they don’t want any now. They just want their lake and their land—their sunswept altar and chapel—for their own, without … Continue reading Righting a Wrong: The Return of Blue Lake to the Taos Pueblo