APOLLO 11: Preparing for the Unthinkable

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park.  An earlier post described the involvement of the Department of State with manned spacecraft launches.  Among other things, it discussed the possibility of a mission-related disaster that forced an aborted landing on the land … Continue reading APOLLO 11: Preparing for the Unthinkable

Apollo 11: The Department of State Prepares for Launch

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Department of State involvement with the U.S. manned space program is little known and little appreciated.  Much of that involvement dealt with mundane matters such as coordinating international visitors to various launches and the … Continue reading Apollo 11: The Department of State Prepares for Launch

Apollo 11: Telling the Story Around the World

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The United States Information Agency (USIA) was responsible for telling the U.S. story abroad.  In early 1969, the upcoming flight of Apollo 11 looked to be the culmination of President John F. Kennedy's May … Continue reading Apollo 11: Telling the Story Around the World

Painting of the events of July 30, 1909.

The First Woman to Fly in an Aeroplane in the United States, October 27, 1909

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. The periodical Aeronautics in its issue of December 1909 reproduced the official log of all the aeroplane flights undertaken at the United States Army Signal Corps aviation field at College Park, Maryland between October 8 and November … Continue reading The First Woman to Fly in an Aeroplane in the United States, October 27, 1909

Image of Plane in the sky

The United States Army Buys Its First Aeroplane, 1909

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. The United States Army wanting an aeroplane, in early 1908, signed a contract with Orville and Wilbur Wright to a acquire one. The contract prescribed certain tests that the aeroplane would have to accomplish before the Army … Continue reading The United States Army Buys Its First Aeroplane, 1909

Image of tower and other buildings with clouds in the background

Building a Radio Tower atop Mount Washington

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. “Believing that the development of experimental facilities on Mount Washington, New Hampshire, is an undertaking that is difficult of verbal description there are attached, hereto, a brief photographic record.  The pictures submitted only … Continue reading Building a Radio Tower atop Mount Washington

Photographic Intelligence: The Civil War

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. One of the mainstays of intelligence collection is photography.  Among the variety of images collected are overhead photography, aerial photography, and what can only be called regular photography.  All three types are represented in … Continue reading Photographic Intelligence: The Civil War

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident III: Follow Up

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Several investigations followed the near-disaster at Three Mile Island.  The most important was the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island established by President Jimmy Carter in April 1979.  The twelve-member panel … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident III: Follow Up

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident II: International Reaction

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The overseas reaction to the Three Mile Island accident was varied.  In most countries the response was muted but there were exceptions.  Examples of the different reactions include (All referenced telegrams can be viewed … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident II: International Reaction

International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident I: Keeping the World Informed

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On March 28, 1979, a nuclear reactor at Three Mile Island outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, experienced a partial meltdown.  While ultimately there was no large-scale release of radioactive materials, the potential for a major disaster … Continue reading International Aspects of the Three Mile Island Incident I: Keeping the World Informed