Elbridge Gerry and the Constitution, 1787-1788

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. It had been a long, hot summer for Elbridge Gerry, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and his colleagues in 1787 at Philadelphia’s Independence Hall. They had come to Philadelphia in May to improve upon the Articles … Continue reading Elbridge Gerry and the Constitution, 1787-1788

Caleb Brewster

Today’s post is written by Jackie Kilby, Archives Technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. After the end of the American Revolutionary War numerous veterans were disabled, or invalid, and petitioned for pensions to the United States Congress and/or their State Governments.  One such person was Caleb Brewster, a name made recognizable by … Continue reading Caleb Brewster

Oliver Pollock – Supporter of the Revolution, Creator of ‘$’

Today's post was written by Jackie Kilby, Archives Technician at the National Archives at College Park, MD. Oliver Pollock is a name not widely known in American History.  He was an Irish immigrant who settled in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and later found work as a successful merchant and trader in Philadelphia.  After the end of the … Continue reading Oliver Pollock – Supporter of the Revolution, Creator of ‘$’

African Americans and the American War for Independence

Today's post is by Dr. Greg Bradsher. Englishman Nicholas Cresswell, during July 1777, wrote in his journal that the American army was composed of a “ragged Banditti of undisciplined people, the scum and refuse of all nations of earth.”  Baron Curt von Stedingk, a Swedish colonel in French service, described the American army in Savannah … Continue reading African Americans and the American War for Independence

Elbridge Gerry and the Constitutional Convention, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher. This September 17th is the 225th birthday of the Constitution.  Undoubtedly thousands of people will visit the Rotunda of the National Archives to see the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights, as well as the Articles of Confederation.  If they look up at the murals … Continue reading Elbridge Gerry and the Constitutional Convention, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights

Happy Mother’s Day to All, Past and Present

As we make our brunch reservations, choose the perfect greeting card, and make the rest of our preparations for Mother’s Day this Sunday, let’s not forget the women, the mothers of our nation, who took a stand for women’s rights and blazed the trail for future movements. Men such as George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas … Continue reading Happy Mother’s Day to All, Past and Present

Determining the Deposition in 1775

This week in 1775, the battles of Lexington and Concord were fought in Massachusetts.  The Massachusetts militia and Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith’s group of British troops suffered casualties, but it is still unclear which side fired the first shot that began the American Revolution. RG 360, The Papers of the Continental Congress, compiled 1774 – … Continue reading Determining the Deposition in 1775

Boston Tea Party Etiquette Lesson 2: Swallowing the Bitter Draught in Rhode Island

In 1774, British Parliament implemented the Coercive Acts in response to the destruction of British property by colonists during the Boston Tea Party.  Paul Revere reproduced an engraving from a London newspaper that depicted the relationship between the British government and America, and he circulated it among the colonies.  A copy of this allegorical cartoon … Continue reading Boston Tea Party Etiquette Lesson 2: Swallowing the Bitter Draught in Rhode Island

Boston Tea Party Etiquette

Today's post is written by Monique Politowski, and is part of her ongoing series on the Federalists. Today is the 238th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party.  On December 16, 1773, men dressed as Native Americans and wearing disguises, destroyed British owned tea by throwing it into the water of Griffin’s Wharf in Boston.  Archives II has … Continue reading Boston Tea Party Etiquette