An 1890 Census Fragment for Alaska is Rediscovered

Today’s post is by Claire Kluskens, Genealogy/Census Subject Matter Expert and Digital Projects Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. The National Archives recently digitized a previously unappreciated fragment of the 1890 census for Alaska. Located in Record Group 29: Records of the Bureau of the Census, digital images are in the National Archives … Continue reading An 1890 Census Fragment for Alaska is Rediscovered

Census Taker Cartoon

Counting Down Until the Release of the 1950 Census!

Today’s post is by Denise Henderson, Blog alum and Director of Digitization in the Office of Research Services. Since it only happens once every ten years, NARA wants to give you plenty of advance notice:  365 days from today, on April 1, 2022, the 1950 Census will be digitally released to the public! The opening … Continue reading Counting Down Until the Release of the 1950 Census!

From Soldier to Citizen: How to use the Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

Today's post comes from Grace Schultz, an archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. Did your immigrant ancestor naturalize after serving in World War I? If so, you may find them in the National Archives Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers (Microfilm Publication M1952) which is available online through all of our digitization … Continue reading From Soldier to Citizen: How to use the Index to Naturalizations of World War I Soldiers

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Some Americans in Canada: The Record Book of Joseph Edwards, Niagara, Upper Canada, April 1812-January 1813

Today’s post comes from Claire Kluskens, Digital Projects Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, DC In the years after the American Revolution an unknown number of U.S. citizens or residents moved across the generally unregulated northern border to continue their lives - perhaps to seek opportunities or cheap land - in the country we now … Continue reading Some Americans in Canada: The Record Book of Joseph Edwards, Niagara, Upper Canada, April 1812-January 1813

Now Available Online: Burial Cards of World War I Soldiers

Today’s post is written by Suzanne Zoumbaris, an Archives Specialist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. On November 11, 1918, before hostilities ended, the 313th Infantry Regiment continued to fight along with other Allied units on the front of the Meuse-Argonne offensive. At 10:59 a.m. only one minute before … Continue reading Now Available Online: Burial Cards of World War I Soldiers

Towards a History of Mexican American Participation in World War I, Part I

Today’s post is the first of a two-part series written by Victoria-María MacDonald and Emma Taylor, who are volunteers at the National Archives at College Park. The centennial anniversary of American involvement in World War I permits a closer look at the diverse racial and ethnic groups who participated in the Great War. In this … Continue reading Towards a History of Mexican American Participation in World War I, Part I

Some assessors adorned their otherwise drab government forms.

Tax Assessment Lists of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Today’s post is written by Elise Fariello, Archives Technician at the National Archives at Chicago  A passionate distaste for taxes is built into the very foundation of the United States. Taxation without consent was one of the grievances to King George III outlined in the Declaration of Independence and played no small part in the … Continue reading Tax Assessment Lists of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Fortuitous Lineage

Today’s post is written by Robert Ripson, a Processing Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. 1430 hours, 28 December 2016, quittin’ time and I am heading towards the sign out sheet and to begin an afternoon of chores. However, I decide to stop and chat with a coworker … Continue reading Fortuitous Lineage

From Scouting for Custer to Farming the Plains; The Life and Times of Hairy Moccasin as Seen in the Crow Indian Agency Records

Today's post was written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. On February 28th, 1876, four Crow Indians enlisted in the U.S. Army as Indian Scouts at Fort Ellis Montana. Those four men: Curly, Goes Ahead, White Man Runs Him, and Hairy Moccasin, were under the command of Colonel Gibbons when on … Continue reading From Scouting for Custer to Farming the Plains; The Life and Times of Hairy Moccasin as Seen in the Crow Indian Agency Records

Know Your Records: Railroad Accident Reports

Today's post is written by David Pfeiffer, a reference archivist at Archives II in College Park, Maryland. There has always been public interest in railroad accident reports, especially by genealogists eager to learn the circumstances of an accident that an ancestor was involved in.  The National Archives at College Park textual reference has accident report … Continue reading Know Your Records: Railroad Accident Reports