“I Am Indeed Proud to Have the Opportunity to Present These Memoranda”: The Environmentalist Photographer Meets the Conservation President

By Daria Labinsky, Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum Together, Mr. President, I am certain we can indeed do this one right the first time! - Ansel Adams to Jimmy Carter, November 6, 1979.[1] While legendary photographer Ansel Adams is best known for his dramatic landscapes, he made images in many genres, … Continue reading “I Am Indeed Proud to Have the Opportunity to Present These Memoranda”: The Environmentalist Photographer Meets the Conservation President

Gordon Gilkey: A Man for All Seasons

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. At the beginning of my freshman year at Oregon State University, I went to see the Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences (now Liberal Arts) to discuss with him the courses I should be … Continue reading Gordon Gilkey: A Man for All Seasons

Propaganda, Politics, and the Personification of FDR: The Uncle Sam Poster Controversy

This is the third and final post in a three-part series on the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In October 1943, Representative Harold Knutson (R-MN) charged the U.S. … Continue reading Propaganda, Politics, and the Personification of FDR: The Uncle Sam Poster Controversy

The Uncle Sam “Hush” Poster and the One That Never Was

This is the second of three posts about the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Uncle Sam by Leon Helguera (left). Uncle Sam by Robert S. Sloan (right). Today, … Continue reading The Uncle Sam “Hush” Poster and the One That Never Was

“I’m Counting on You” by Leon Helguera: A Mexican Artist Puts His Stamp on Uncle Sam

This is the first of three posts about the Uncle Sam poster for the Security of War Information campaign. Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In 1943, Mexican born artist Leon Helguera was commissioned by the U.S. Office of … Continue reading “I’m Counting on You” by Leon Helguera: A Mexican Artist Puts His Stamp on Uncle Sam

A poster depicting two hands saluting with an Uncle Sam hat and a Mexican sombrero.

Americans All by Leon Helguera: Appealing to Hispanics on the Home Front in World War II

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In the holdings of the National Archives and Presidential Libraries there are many pictures that reflect the American experience. The image of Rosie the Riveter in - We Can Do it, or Uncle Sam … Continue reading Americans All by Leon Helguera: Appealing to Hispanics on the Home Front in World War II

Beyond the Records in the Hub

Today’s post is by Candice Blazejak, an Archives Technician on detail at NARA’s Innovation Hub in Washington, DC Researchers and curious visitors come into National Archives facilities everyday looking for long lost information or out of general curiosity.  They focus on what the records contain more so than what they look like.  Recently, I started … Continue reading Beyond the Records in the Hub

“Arias Bernal’s Trip to Washington”: a Mexican Cartoonist Joins the War Effort

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives, College Park. Antonio Arias Bernal, an accomplished Mexican political cartoonist, came to Washington, D.C. in 1942 at the invitation of the U.S. government to create editorial cartoons to promote the Allied war effort. Prior to being invited, … Continue reading “Arias Bernal’s Trip to Washington”: a Mexican Cartoonist Joins the War Effort

Considerable Talent and Great Promise: the Early Years of Navajo Artist Beatien Yazz

Today’s post is written by Cody White, National Archives at Denver, with special thanks to Gwen Granados; National Archives at Riverside, John Seamans; National Archives at San Francisco, and Theresa Fitzgerald; National Archives at St. Louis “…I had the pleasure of seeing some of the paintings of Beatin [sic] Yazz. He is a young Navajo … Continue reading Considerable Talent and Great Promise: the Early Years of Navajo Artist Beatien Yazz

“Cutting Capers on the Sands of North Africa”: A Soldier’s Art before, during, and after World War II

Today’s post was written by Jennifer Eltringham, a summer 2016 intern at the National Archives at Denver. Albert Racine of the Blackfoot Tribe from Browning, Montana, enlisted in the U.S. Army in April of 1942, one day before his 35th birthday. When he left home to serve in World War II, however, he was not alone. … Continue reading “Cutting Capers on the Sands of North Africa”: A Soldier’s Art before, during, and after World War II