A poster depicting two hands saluting with an Uncle Sam hat and a Mexican sombrero.

Americans All by Leon Helguera: Appealing to Hispanics on the Home Front in World War II

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, MD. In the holdings of the National Archives and Presidential Libraries there are many pictures that reflect the American experience. The image of Rosie the Riveter in - We Can Do it, or Uncle Sam … Continue reading Americans All by Leon Helguera: Appealing to Hispanics on the Home Front in World War II

Beyond the Records in the Hub

Today’s post is by Candice Blazejak, an Archives Technician on detail at NARA’s Innovation Hub in Washington, DC Researchers and curious visitors come into National Archives facilities everyday looking for long lost information or out of general curiosity.  They focus on what the records contain more so than what they look like.  Recently, I started … Continue reading Beyond the Records in the Hub

“Arias Bernal’s Trip to Washington”: a Mexican Cartoonist Joins the War Effort

Today’s post is written by Daniel Dancis, an Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives, College Park. Antonio Arias Bernal, an accomplished Mexican political cartoonist, came to Washington, D.C. in 1942 at the invitation of the U.S. government to create editorial cartoons to promote the Allied war effort. Prior to being invited, … Continue reading “Arias Bernal’s Trip to Washington”: a Mexican Cartoonist Joins the War Effort

Considerable Talent and Great Promise: the Early Years of Navajo Artist Beatien Yazz

Today’s post is written by Cody White, National Archives at Denver, with special thanks to Gwen Granados; National Archives at Riverside, John Seamans; National Archives at San Francisco, and Theresa Fitzgerald; National Archives at St. Louis “…I had the pleasure of seeing some of the paintings of Beatin [sic] Yazz. He is a young Navajo … Continue reading Considerable Talent and Great Promise: the Early Years of Navajo Artist Beatien Yazz

“Cutting Capers on the Sands of North Africa”: A Soldier’s Art before, during, and after World War II

Today’s post was written by Jennifer Eltringham, a summer 2016 intern at the National Archives at Denver. Albert Racine of the Blackfoot Tribe from Browning, Montana, enlisted in the U.S. Army in April of 1942, one day before his 35th birthday. When he left home to serve in World War II, however, he was not alone. … Continue reading “Cutting Capers on the Sands of North Africa”: A Soldier’s Art before, during, and after World War II

Terry and the Pirates strip of December 2, 1943

“Terry and the Pirates” Spreads the Word on Security During World War II

Today's post is written by David Langbart, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. From August 28, 1943 to February 6, 1944, the plot line of one of America's most popular daily comic strips, "Terry and the Pirates" by Milton Caniff, included as one element the issue of information security.  Even though the action … Continue reading “Terry and the Pirates” Spreads the Word on Security During World War II

Drawing of the Dragon Lady

Milton Caniff Explains “Terry and the Pirates”

In early 1945, "Terry and the Pirates" was one of the most popular daily comic strips printed in U.S. newspapers. The strip, launched in October 1934, and written by Milton Caniff (1907-1988), was a serial action-adventure strip set in China and its environs.  Once World War II began, the action took place within the context … Continue reading Milton Caniff Explains “Terry and the Pirates”

How The West Was Drawn: the Art of Charles Marion Russell in the National Archives at Denver

Today’s post is written by Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver.  Strolling the two Western American Art galleries at the Denver Art Museum one can see several examples of famed western artist Charles Marion Russell’s depictions, in both paint and bronze, of the American West, but Russell’s work can also be seen … Continue reading How The West Was Drawn: the Art of Charles Marion Russell in the National Archives at Denver

Cartoonist Clifford Berryman on Thanksgiving

Political cartoonist Clifford Berryman made use of Thanksgiving throughout his career to highlight timely political issues near the holiday. Below are two examples of his Thanksgiving-themed cartoons: These and other cartoons by Clifford Berryman can be found in Record Group 46 in the series "Berryman Political Cartoon Collection, 1896-1949" (ARC Identifier 306080) as part of the Center … Continue reading Cartoonist Clifford Berryman on Thanksgiving

Remembering Andy through the Archives

  Today's post is written by Liz Caringola, who works on our ancestry.com digitization project.   February 22, 2012, marks the 25th anniversary of the death of American pop artist Andy Warhol.  The Pittsburgh native rose to fame in the 1960s as one of the most prominent members of the American pop art movement.  He … Continue reading Remembering Andy through the Archives