The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part II – William Slater Brown

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. The previous post described the French internment of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown during World War I because of the latter's comments in letters home.  It ended with the release of Cummings and his return to … Continue reading The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part II – William Slater Brown

The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part I – E.E. Cummings

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives at College Park. E.E. Cummings (Edward Estlin Cummings) is widely regarded as one of America's greatest poets.  A 1915 graduate of Harvard University, during World War I he volunteered for the ambulance service operated by the American Red Cross in … Continue reading The Incarceration of E.E. Cummings and William Slater Brown in France during World War I as Reflected in Department of State Records: Part I – E.E. Cummings

Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences II: France

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. An earlier post described the request for information about overseas experience with Daylight Saving Time made to the Department of State by Marcus Marks, President of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City.  … Continue reading Daylight Saving Time: The Early Experiences II: France

Street view of the 1st Battalion Headquarters, 313th Infantry Regt.

“Until the Glad News Comes”: A Letter from Verdun after the Great War

Today’s post is by Jordan Patty, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives in College Park, MD While working on a project with Record Group 391 in the series Records of the 1st Through 338th and the 559th Infantry Regiment, 1/1/1916 - 12/31/1921 (NAID 604387), I came across an interesting letter that … Continue reading “Until the Glad News Comes”: A Letter from Verdun after the Great War

William H. Hunt, American Pioneer

This post is also featured on our Rediscovering Black History blog. By David Langbart. At the outbreak of World War I, William H. Hunt was serving as the U.S. Consul in St. Etienne, France.  In addition to his official duties, Hunt was also a true American pioneer.  In 1914, he was one of the very … Continue reading William H. Hunt, American Pioneer

Image of: Major Howie's body was symbolically laid on the rubble of St. Croix Cathedral.

Rebuilding After World War II: The Experience of Saint-Lo, France

By David Langbart. Scholars are increasingly writing about the physical destruction visited upon friendly European countries during World War II’s campaign to free Western Europe from Nazi domination.  Recent books such as Keith Lowe’s SAVAGE CONTINENT, Antony Beevor’s D-DAY, Max Hastings’s ARMAGEDDON, and Rick Atkinson’s THE GUNS AT LAST LIGHT (all quite excellent and worth … Continue reading Rebuilding After World War II: The Experience of Saint-Lo, France