An Unsuspected Foe: Shark Attacks during World War II

Today's post was written by Megan Dwyre, Archivist at the National Archives in College Park. Several species of shark have been known to attack a swimming man. Your chances of encountering one of these are not great…– Extract from "Survival on Land and Sea."[1] "Shark Attacks", a 1944 survey conducted by the Coordinator of Research and Development, U.S. … Continue reading An Unsuspected Foe: Shark Attacks during World War II

The Tale of Tartar the War Horse (Part II)

Today's post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher and is the continuation of last week's post. On April 9, 1863, President Lincoln met Tartar.  On that day the President reviewed I Corps (commanded by Maj. Gen. John Reynolds) of the Army of the Potomac and freed slaves serving in the army on a plain two … Continue reading The Tale of Tartar the War Horse (Part II)

The Tale of Tartar the War Horse

Today's post is the first part of a two-part story told to us by Dr. Greg Bradsher. Look for part two next week!   In early July 1857, Captain John W. Phelps, commanding officer of Battery B, 4th Regiment of Artillery, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, was acquiring horses for his battery for its planned expedition … Continue reading The Tale of Tartar the War Horse

Rusty the Comfort Dog

Today’s post is written by Onaona Guay, a processing archivist in College Park. Among the handmade ephemera of the September 11 Recovery Program records are a few professionally made items.  One of these items is an autographed photographic portrait of Rusty.  Following the September 11 attacks, many individuals volunteered their time and skills to the … Continue reading Rusty the Comfort Dog