The Pentagon Papers: The Department of State Supports Action in the Courts

As noted in a previous post, the legal battle over publication of the “Pentagon Papers” by the New York Times took place in the Federal court in New York, where the Times was located.  To support the government’s position in court, the Department sent information to its officials in New York City through the U.S. … Continue reading The Pentagon Papers: The Department of State Supports Action in the Courts

The Pentagon Papers: The Department of State Reacts

On June 13, 1971, the New York Times began publishing articles based on a “Top Secret” Office of the Secretary of Defense study of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967.  The study had been leaked to that newspaper by Daniel Ellsberg, one of the analysts who worked on the project. The study, entitled … Continue reading The Pentagon Papers: The Department of State Reacts

Tony Dedman school portrait

Remembering Tony Dedman

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records 58,318. That’s how many names are carved into the reflective black marble of the wall, or were as of 2017 according to the National Park Service. Today, I just want to talk … Continue reading Remembering Tony Dedman

Operation JACK STAY: US Marines in the Forest of Assassins

Today’s post is by Nathanial Patch, Reference Archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD and Subject Matter Expert for Navy Records. Section I: Enemy at the Outskirts On February 27, 1966, the Panamanian cargo ship, SS Lorinda, was sailing up the Long Tau River heading towards Saigon. The Long Tau is the deep … Continue reading Operation JACK STAY: US Marines in the Forest of Assassins

“Amazingly Poor Judgement”: Robert Sam Anson in Cambodia, August 1970

Today's post was written by David Langbart, archivist in Textual Reference at the National Archives in College Park, MD Noted journalist Robert Sam Anson died on November 2, 2020.  The obituaries printed in The New York Times and The Washington Post mentioned that he was captured and held by Communist forces in Cambodia while covering … Continue reading “Amazingly Poor Judgement”: Robert Sam Anson in Cambodia, August 1970

Dean Rusk Remembers World War II, 1968

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. Dean Rusk served as Secretary of State from January 1961 to January 1969, the second longest tenure in that job in U.S. history.  As with many men of his generation, he saw military service … Continue reading Dean Rusk Remembers World War II, 1968

April is National Poetry Month! Let’s enjoy some USCG poems

Today's post was written by me, M. Marie Maxwell, an Archives Specialist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Although normally I work in Textual Processing, I am engaged in a short detail with the Archives' Innovation Hub in the same Washington, DC location. It's April. Spring is springing. Birds are singing. Poetry is in … Continue reading April is National Poetry Month! Let’s enjoy some USCG poems

Vietnam Negotiations, 1968: The Problem of Leaks

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The fall of 1968 leading up to the Presidential election on November 5, saw active peace negotiations between the United States and North Vietnam.[1] One (among many) aspect of the situation that threatened to … Continue reading Vietnam Negotiations, 1968: The Problem of Leaks

The Presidential Election of 1972: Analysis of Soviet Bloc Opinion

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. The presidential election of 1972 came in the midst of the U.S. rapprochement with the USSR known as detente.  Earlier in the year, President Richard Nixon traveled to Moscow for a major summit with … Continue reading The Presidential Election of 1972: Analysis of Soviet Bloc Opinion

Vietnam and the Ironies of History

By David Langbart "This is an American soldier – he is your friend."  So read the leaflet prepared by the United States for use in Vietnam.  Underneath that caption, it pictured several American infantrymen advancing into combat. The time, however, was not the 1960s; it was mid-1945 and World War II in the Pacific was … Continue reading Vietnam and the Ironies of History