Summer 2014 Interns at the National Archives at College Park

Today's post was written by Dr. Tina Ligon, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, MD. This summer, the National Archives at College Park brought in nine interns from across the country to learn about the archival profession. The interns had the opportunity to assist in customer service and with several current processing projects, under … Continue reading Summer 2014 Interns at the National Archives at College Park

Spring 2014 Interns at the National Archives in College Park

Today's post is written by Dr. Tina Ligon, Archivist at the National Archives in College Park. The unpaid internship program at the National Archives gives undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to experience actual archival work, under the guidance of an experienced archivist.  Selected candidates work in the either the processing or reference sections on various … Continue reading Spring 2014 Interns at the National Archives in College Park

Rosslyn Skyline

By Marie Maxwell Recently, the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC), a federal agency charged with planning for the Washington, DC area, released a draft study regarding the height of buildings inside the District of Columbia. The city of Washington, DC does not have skyscrapers like New York or Chicago, because of a law limiting tall buildings. … Continue reading Rosslyn Skyline

Shutdown

Due to the Federal Government shutdown, the National Archives (www.archives.gov) is closed. We are unable to post or participate in any of our social media channels during this closure. All National Archives facilities are closed, with the exception of the Federal Records Centers and the Federal Register until the Federal government reopens.

Buffalo Bill and Urbanizing the Taming of his Wild West

Today's post is written by Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver. He is not related to Buffalo Bill. It is said that nobody can stop progress… and apparently not even William “Buffalo Bill” Cody when in the early 20th century he resorted to relying on his clout with President Theodore Roosevelt to … Continue reading Buffalo Bill and Urbanizing the Taming of his Wild West

“A Rumbling Fearful Noise”: Charleston Earthquake of 1886

Today's guest blogger is Nick Baric, an archivist in the Archives I Processing Section. On August 23, 2011, the Washington, DC, area was rocked by the one of the largest east coast earthquakes in recorded U.S. history. Few of us who were around on that day will ever forget where they were when it struck, … Continue reading “A Rumbling Fearful Noise”: Charleston Earthquake of 1886

A Vaccinated Nation

Today’s blogger is Megan Hamby, a summer 2013 intern in the Archives I Reference and Processing Sections who worked with Army records. While processing a series from the Department of Veterans Affairs (Record Group 15), I came across a piece of correspondence from the Colorado State Medical Society to Dr. J.C. Cornell, Supervisor, United States Public … Continue reading A Vaccinated Nation

Plumage of Pomp: The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935

By Jason Clingerman The past Saturday, I was visiting the Florida Keys and took a bike tour of parts of Islamorada, a village which spans several islands. The meeting place for the tour was a memorial to the victims of the 1935 Labor Day hurricane located near mile marker 82 of U.S. Route 1. Our guide … Continue reading Plumage of Pomp: The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935

Happy World Red Cross Red Crescent Day!

By Jason Clingerman Today is Henry Dunant's birthday, which is also celebrated as World Red Cross Red Crescent Day. In honor of that holiday, I thought I would mention some Red Cross records of historical interest that can be found at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland (Archives II) in Collection ANRC, Records of … Continue reading Happy World Red Cross Red Crescent Day!

Publius says “Trick or Treat!”

Today's post is written by Monique Politowski, and is part of her ongoing series on the Federalists. It must have been weird for the readers of the New York Independent Journal to see an essay supposedly written by a long since dead Roman.  Hamilton, Jay, and Madison all used the pseudonym “Publius,” intentionally becoming the … Continue reading Publius says “Trick or Treat!”