Black and white photograph of a ship

Over 500 Logbooks of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Ships Now Available in the National Archives Catalog

Today’s post was written by Gina Kim Perry, Archivist in Digitization Archival Services at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. USC&GSS Hassler (1893), named after Ferdinand Rudolph Hassler, who was appointed by President Thomas Jefferson as the first head of the Survey of Coast in 1807 (NOAA Photo Library) Introduction Newly available in the National Archives … Continue reading Over 500 Logbooks of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Ships Now Available in the National Archives Catalog

Hand drawn map of where bodies were buried in Nelson Private Cemetery.

A (Not So) Final Resting Place: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cemetery Relocation Project in Hawley, Pennsylvania

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. When we lay our loved ones to rest, we expect their remains to… well… remain. However, final resting places are not always final. As can be seen with the relocation of two cemeteries in the 1950s and 1960s in Wayne County, … Continue reading A (Not So) Final Resting Place: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cemetery Relocation Project in Hawley, Pennsylvania

Documenting the Deceased: Typhoid Fever During the Spanish-American War

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. While the Spanish-American War lasted four months (April 21 – August 13, 1898), it resulted in almost 2,500 deaths of American soldiers.[1] The short-lived conflict officially came to a close with the Treaty of Paris, which was signed on December 10, … Continue reading Documenting the Deceased: Typhoid Fever During the Spanish-American War

Notated layout plan for Heart Mountain Relocation Camp. Atlas on bottom right corner acts as key to map.

Japanese American Internment and Resistance at Heart Mountain

Today’s post is written by Lucas Blackwood, an intern at the National Archives at Denver. When World War II began the United States chose to remain neutral and did not join the war right away. Then, on December 7, 1941, Japan, part of the axis powers and allied with Germany, attacked the U.S. military base … Continue reading Japanese American Internment and Resistance at Heart Mountain

Sepia tone photograph of buildings in the desert

The Stories Behind the Names: Death at the Santa Fe Indian School, 1891–1909

Today’s post is by Cody White and Rose Buchanan, Subject Matter Experts for Native American Related Records. Warning: the following piece along with associated archival records discuss the death of minors. The names of students who died at Native American boarding schools should not be buried in government files; they should be known. For accountability, … Continue reading The Stories Behind the Names: Death at the Santa Fe Indian School, 1891–1909

Equalization and its Role in Dismantling Racial Segregation in Virginia Public Schools

Today’s post was written by Grace Schultz, archivist at the National Archives at Philadelphia. A companion lesson plan can be viewed here on DocsTeach. The fight to desegregate schools started long before the Supreme Court’s decision in Oliver Brown, et al. v. Board of Education of Topeka, et al., and it continues today. As can … Continue reading Equalization and its Role in Dismantling Racial Segregation in Virginia Public Schools

The Grisly Tale of the “Colorado Cannibal” Alfred Packer, as Seen in the Records of the Office of Indian Affairs

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist and Subject Matter Expert for Native American Related Records. What exactly happened in the brutal winter conditions of Colorado's San Juan Mountains nearly 150 years ago, when Alfred Packer survived by eating the bodies of his five companions, will never be known—only Packer lived to tell the … Continue reading The Grisly Tale of the “Colorado Cannibal” Alfred Packer, as Seen in the Records of the Office of Indian Affairs

Ten Years of NARA-NOAA Partnership

Today’s post was written by Gina Kim Perry, archivist in Digitization Archival Services at the National Archives at College Park, MD. 2022 marks ten years since the National Archives (NARA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) began their partnership to image select records from NARA and upload them to the NARA Catalog. The … Continue reading Ten Years of NARA-NOAA Partnership