Run for the border: Beer Bootlegging during the Prohibition

Today’s post is written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver. “Dear Sir. This Company is not making any ‘near-beer of any kind at present and not until Mont. goes dry yours very truly Lewistown Brewing Co.” So wrote Gus Hodel and his Lewistown Brewing Company of Montana in April 1918, a … Continue reading Run for the border: Beer Bootlegging during the Prohibition

“We Suggest a Bacardi Cocktail Before Lunch,” WWII Era Menus from the Mountain West

By Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver This post is dedicated to the memory of historian Robert “Bob” Autobee, 1961-2018, whose many writing credits include a co-write of the book “Lost Restaurants of Denver,” and from whose various discussions of restaurant and food history with me while working in our research room … Continue reading “We Suggest a Bacardi Cocktail Before Lunch,” WWII Era Menus from the Mountain West

I Can’t Believe It’s Not Oleomargarine

Today’s post was written by Jessica Lee.  She was a summer intern in the Archives 1 Reference Section, working with the Civil records team. During my internship, I have had the opportunity to work with archivists on different kinds of projects. For one assignment, I entered titles of various public and private laws and resolutions … Continue reading I Can’t Believe It’s Not Oleomargarine

letter written on Golden Brewery stationary showing Castle Rock

Lithograph Company v. Adolph Coors – a Case of an Unpaid Tab

Today's post was written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver 142 years ago this fall Adolf Coors, along with Denver businessman Jacob Shueler, recorded a deed of purchase for an abandoned tannery in Golden, Colorado. Within months the building would become home to the Golden Brewery, thus beginning a new chapter … Continue reading Lithograph Company v. Adolph Coors – a Case of an Unpaid Tab

It (perhaps) does a body good

Photograph caption: Albert Johnson, member of the Milk Wagon Drivers Union, at work, Duluth. From RG 69, General Records of the Workers' Service Program, Service Division, Work Projects Administration. Not directly related to the information below; just a beautiful image. In June 1941, W. G. Campbell launched a sweeping investigation. As the Commissioner of Food … Continue reading It (perhaps) does a body good

For love of country

As the US involvement in World War II heightened, the nation faced many critical shortages. Certainly sugar and butter come to mind, as do images of children collecting bottle caps and pieces of glass. But "Mrs. Housewife" was called to her patriotic duty to conserve another good: household fats. The Conservation Division of the War … Continue reading For love of country