A Most Remarkable Accomplishment: Changing the Name of a NATO Working Group

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. In late 1962, Lt. Col. John TeSelle, U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps, then assigned to the United States Mission to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), made a suggestion that the name of a NATO Working Group, … Continue reading A Most Remarkable Accomplishment: Changing the Name of a NATO Working Group

The Office of Strategic Services and the SIMCOL Operation in Italy October 1943

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. At the time of the Italian Armistice on September 8, 1943, there were almost 80,000 Allied prisoners of war in Italian prisoner of war camps.[1]  When the Allied prisoners of war learned of the Armistice, most were in … Continue reading The Office of Strategic Services and the SIMCOL Operation in Italy October 1943

Stories of American Escapees from Prisoner of War Camp 59, Servigliano, Part II

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. While many American escapees returned to Allied lines in 1943, once having escaped from Camp 59, as was seen in Part I, many were not able to return until 1944. These are some of their stories. PFC Richard … Continue reading Stories of American Escapees from Prisoner of War Camp 59, Servigliano, Part II

Stories of American Escapees from Prisoner of War Camp 59, Servigliano, Italy – Part I

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. At the time of the Italian Armistice on September 8, 1943, there were almost 80,000 Allied prisoners of war in Italian camps.  Among these prisoners of war were 1,310 Americans; many were soldiers captured in North Africa and … Continue reading Stories of American Escapees from Prisoner of War Camp 59, Servigliano, Italy – Part I

“Let’s Make a Movie:” The Allied Screening Commission (Italy) and the documentary Onore al Merito (To Whom Honor is Due), 1946

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. During World War II, over 100,000 Italians helped at least 10,000 Allied escapees and evaders, by providing material and financial assistance to them in their efforts in avoiding being seized by the Germans and Fascists, as well as … Continue reading “Let’s Make a Movie:” The Allied Screening Commission (Italy) and the documentary Onore al Merito (To Whom Honor is Due), 1946

The Dunkirk Story, May-June 1940, and A French Perspective

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. During early May 1940, British, French, Dutch, and Belgian forces were fighting to stem the German advances, which had begun May 10, into France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. During May 11, much of the Dutch Army was put … Continue reading The Dunkirk Story, May-June 1940, and A French Perspective

“See Something, Say Something”: UFO Reporting Requirements, Office of Military Government for Bavaria, Germany May 1948

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher and Dr. Sylvia Naylor, Archivists at the National Archives at College Park. In May 1948 the Office of Military Government for Bavaria, Germany, issued instructions for reporting sightings of “flying discs.”  These instructions were issued as a result of requirements from higher headquarters in Germany and in … Continue reading “See Something, Say Something”: UFO Reporting Requirements, Office of Military Government for Bavaria, Germany May 1948

Winston Churchill Goes to Gettysburg, 1932

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In addition to being a politician and government official, Winston Churchill was an avid writer.  He wrote for newspapers and magazines, as well as books of biography, history, travel, and autobiography and memoir.  Indeed, … Continue reading Winston Churchill Goes to Gettysburg, 1932

“Cutting Capers on the Sands of North Africa”: A Soldier’s Art before, during, and after World War II

Today’s post was written by Jennifer Eltringham, a summer 2016 intern at the National Archives at Denver. Albert Racine of the Blackfoot Tribe from Browning, Montana, enlisted in the U.S. Army in April of 1942, one day before his 35th birthday. When he left home to serve in World War II, however, he was not alone. … Continue reading “Cutting Capers on the Sands of North Africa”: A Soldier’s Art before, during, and after World War II

New Webpage for World War I Records on the Meuse-Argonne Offensive

Today’s post is written by Scott Ludwig, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. The 26th of September marks the 98th Anniversary of the start of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, which was the largest operation of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) in World War I.  Commanded by General of the Armies John J. "Black Jack" Pershing … Continue reading New Webpage for World War I Records on the Meuse-Argonne Offensive